My Sketchbook
#1
Hi and welcome to my sketchbook!
Art is my hobby and I hope to get better by the years with a lot of practise.
I don't have a lot of spare time, but I will keep drawing.
This sketchbook is there to show my progress and get advice.
C&C is appreciated :)
This is what I did today (Loomis study):


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#2


Some anatomy :)

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#3
All heads with photo ref, figures with loomis, skeleton with bammes.


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#4
The first three pictures are old (before I created this sketchbook), the last two are from this week (all with their reference next to them).


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#5
I'm still trying to learn something about values and composition by creating value thumbnails of some famous paintings.


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#6
Don't waste your time with this for now. You're lacking of fundamentals. You will not understand values if you don't understand form and shapes. Take a step back and learn from the very beginning.

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#7
There's truth to what Anton just said. But I also believe that we get better at our own pace! If you insist on doing value studies, maybe I can share a tip.

When doing a value study, probably best if you try to nail the values as close as possible to the original image. From what I've observed, your study is not as bad of an attempt. But I believe it can still be more accurate!

Here's a B/W version of the original side by side with your attempt (and some notes if you don't mind!)


One way to check your values is to "Proof Colors" in Photoshop. That's assuming you're using Photoshop. Check this out if you haven't! http://www.artofscholes.com/checkingvalues/

Good luck! Hope to see more from you!

It's debatable whether or not what you're trying to achieve is indeed impossible. One thing's for sure: it's impossible to defeat a person who doesn't know how to quit.
----
IG: @thatpuddinhead
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#8
Thank you very much for your advice! :)
I didn't know that proof color feature existed, I will try it out next time. I'm not exactly sure how to get better on form and shape, so I started to do the first drawabox lesson. If you know a better exercise please feel free to tell me. You can also refer to videos from schoolism or gnomon (I will watch Basic Perspective Form Drawing). Or should I just google some images of cones and so on and do a black and white still life of them?


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#9
I never did Draw-a-box, yet I am vouching for it since I see people do Draw-a-box who benefited from that exercise. I do see the advantage of going through that grind. When I construct something, whether it be anatomy, or buildings/environments, or whatever, it all boils down to cubes, cylinders, and spheres.

For form, I did greatly benefit from doing cast drawings and Bargue studies in the past. Which I think I should be getting on with it again since I feel like I never do much of them.

For shapes, I read Alla Prima by Richard Schmidt. And probably do portrait/master studies from time to time. And I asked around people in the forums or through the CD Discord https://discord.gg/azX8fwT 

There were a lot of people in this forum who taught me about shapes and what it really means. But if I remember correctly, it was Amit Dutta and Tristan Berndt who taught me the bulk of what I'm using now about shapes. I had a good talk with OtherMuzz about forms. They seem to know their shit.

Btw, hope you keep in mind what works for me might probably not work for you, and vice-versa. See what drill works for you and stick with that!

Here's to hoping Anton has better suggestions!

It's debatable whether or not what you're trying to achieve is indeed impossible. One thing's for sure: it's impossible to defeat a person who doesn't know how to quit.
----
IG: @thatpuddinhead
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#10
I watched the Dan Luvisi tutorials for lips and eyes. Along with the video, I tried to copy what he was doing, but I didn't render it much. After this I tried to apply what I have learned to a complete face, but it didn't end up well. Looking back at it I see a lot of mistakes and things I have to study. I didn't finish it, but I am uploading it anyway to show my progress.


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#11
I'm back, this time with a still life. I rendered it for some hours, because I never really do this and I wanted to get out of my comfort zone. I took the picture myself and tried to get some different surfaces to study.



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#12
wow nice still life dude ! good to see someone working hard ! keep it up !

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#13
That still life is soooo juicy *.*

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#14
Thank you guys :)
It has been a while since my last post. I don't spend much time drawing, but at least I do it regularly.
This time I have done some black and white thumbnails again. Five from masters, five from imagination.
Someone gave me a critique, here is the verdict:
The master studies are quite accurate, only minor differences in value.
However, I have to improve in anatomy and proportion in my own thumbnails. In addition I misplaced a lot of things in the corners and often created tensions instead of overlaps. Perspective is also quite a bit off.
My plan is to do some more value studies, and before I draw something like a human again, I will try to study anatomy and proportion again.


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#15
Another value study from a photograph I took :)
The grid on the microphone was a real pain, I painted it at least 4 times, but now I think it's looking ok :D
The highlight on the lemon was tricky, too.
I will be working on other materials next.


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#16
The Sargent study and the rocks have been done directly in color.
For the armor and tree I started in values because I am not too comfortable with color right now and it is easier to change things this way.
I stopped rendering the armor at some point, because I think it was taking too much time and I did not know if I am still learning or just noodeling. I still see inaccurate forms and stuff but I think the general idea is readable. The color (mostly on an overlay layer) took about half an hour, grayscale took probably over 15 hours.
The tree took a lot less time, because it is not rendered that much. I started with a rough black and white sketch and overlayed it with color and rendered it more. The colors are less saturated than in the original. The shapes are also inaccurate, but I think it is not that important, since it's not man-made. The forms and colors of the rocks are not that accurate, too. I also dislike how the rock on the right is looking, I tried to fix it but it still seems too smooth.
I did the Sargent study to apply some things I have seen in a video about facial coloring. I think the colors are not vivid enough and too dark.


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#17
Hey 123 !
You've made some seriously great progress starting from #11. Keep doing black & white studies (or something from imagination), color is easiest to control when you have your values nicely laid out. And one advice that is pretty much always relevant - flip your canvas horizontally every 30 minutes or so, it's staggering how many flaws you can suddenly see :) good luck man !

I'm not the best with social media.

I attach a scribble/sketch to every post/reply I make in my threads. It might not be very sane.
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#18
Thank you Narog :) I already flip vertically from time to time, but maybe I will add horizontally to get a fresh look easier. I think this will help because I often spot flaws after not seeing my paintings for some time.

My goal this time was to paint less soft than before and get better saturation and contrast in a still life. I started with a black and white painting. I shot the reference picture with some interesting objects I had laying around in my basement. I feel like it is too soft and has not enough contrast. I colored it, but it felt too desaturated. Because of this I then started painting opaquely on top to fix my mistakes. It still looks weird and I got a little frustrated, so I stopped. After that I started a Sargent study just for fun. I think especially the construction of the face can be improved. Now I have a fresh view on my still life and I will try to get it done, so I can learn from my mistakes.


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#19
nice sargent study, would be extremely impressive if you could pull off that quality with oils or traditional. Not a lot of drawing going on, just painting, decide what you want to do in art, but drawing is very important, you cant just do studies forever

70+Page Koala Sketchbook: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-3465.html SB

Paintover thread, submit for crits! http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-7879.html
[color=rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.882)]e owl sat on an oak. The more he saw, the less he spoke.[/color]
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#20
(05-02-2019, 07:11 AM)Fedodika Wrote: nice sargent study, would be extremely impressive if you could pull off that quality with oils or traditional. Not a lot of drawing going on, just painting, decide what you want to do in art, but drawing is very important, you cant just do studies forever

He can do reproduction with is own twist but it as to have it own signature style i would say.But it right study without application is a death trap some people don"t learn to escape.

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from is own error.
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