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#41
A huge thank you for taking the time to explain it to me it’s starting to make sense. I defiantly feel there are more fundamental problems in my art, but the sense of space I see in some artists that makes me drool. It’s just form masturbation but I enjoy it. The 3D tests have just been idea that I’d like to fold into my more fundamental problems. I’m sure there are better ways to go about it. The life drawing exercises sound like a good idea I’m adding to my list.
These are some recent sketches testing the pencil tool in procreate. I noticed on the girl in the bottom middle sits in space better than my normal stuff, and I’m not sure I would of been able to that before the 3D stuff. The problem with me jumping around so much is not knowing what’s working and what isn’t, but if I get too bored I’ll lose interest. The girl is enough of a taste to keep me toying with the idea for awhile longer.
Also noticed I called you by the wrong name in an earlier post. Sometimes the names all fold into each other, but mentally I had both of you separated, so please don’t take offense.
[Image: 6sPnfkp.jpg]
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#42
Trying to catch up on the long theoretical discussion. First of all, I'm really glad "thinking in 3D" is your goal. I was merely trying to say that a complex shape is extremely difficult to "turn around in your mind" and render. However, if your eye is keen and you have recorded many angles of that shape in your subconscious, things will be easier. And people heads are one of those things we see everyday without paying attention (note these last three words). But if you try to render a head from an unusual angle, you will struggle quite a long time confronting your drawing to your memory until it goes "yay, that's it!" And the final point is that a keen eye is something that is acquired by life drawing, it will train you to observe, and this will persist even when you are not actually trying to observe.
So, I think we all three are more or less on the same page, just using different words?
On the topic of sitting in space, one thing that can help your hand and eye is drawing some of the environment where a character is located, a patch of ground, a rock to sit on, a wall to lean onto, etc. And shadows.

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#43
(11-14-2019, 10:58 AM)Leo Ki Wrote: Trying to catch up on the long theoretical discussion. First of all, I'm really glad "thinking in 3D" is your goal. I was merely trying to say that a complex shape is extremely difficult to "turn around in your mind" and render. However, if your eye is keen and you have recorded many angles of that shape in your subconscious, things will be easier. And people heads are one of those things we see everyday without paying attention (note these last three words). But if you try to render a head from an unusual angle, you will struggle quite a long time confronting your drawing to your memory until it goes "yay, that's it!" And the final point is that a keen eye is something that is acquired by life drawing, it will train you to observe, and this will persist even when you are not actually trying to observe.
So, I think we all three are more or less on the same page, just using different words?
On the topic of sitting in space, one thing that can help your hand and eye is drawing some of the environment where a character is located, a patch of ground, a rock to sit on, a wall to lean onto, etc. And shadows.

Communication is hard, and I’m sure if we really broke everything down we’d probably find out we’re all talking in circles. It feels like I have worse communication skills than a 3 year old autistic child at times. I’d like to get my drawing skills to a point where I don’t have to rely on environments to convey a sense of space, but I agree it would help.

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#44

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