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Full Version: Smartest way to get into the gaming industry?
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I'd really like to get into the game industry. Anything art related is fine with me, so instead of aiming high, I'd like to start out as a texture artist or something. I've yet to go to college, so I'm trying to decide on the best way to go about getting the training needed to be good enough to get a job.

I've seen tons of posts talking about how costly it is to attend art school, (I'm in the United States). So my plan so far was to hope for a scholarship. If I got a good enough scholarship, or something I might consider attending a college, but if I have to take on lots of debt... I don't think it would be worth it. The Noah Bradley article on why one shouldn't go to art school, and other alternatives is a good start, but all the alternate resources, such as the ateliers he lists are all on the west coast, and I live on the east coast. The online courses are possible, but I feel online courses are far less superior than actual, live instruction.

What I'm trying to say is, if any of you have any good alternatives for building foundational art skills around the east coast, or can recommend a good art school I could try to apply to and get a scholarship, I'd really appreciate it.

The reason why I'm posting this is because today I visited a college claiming to be one of the best for game design. All the evidence I've seen says otherwise... some of their "rising star students" have terrible portfolios. I could even say one of theirs was worse than the one I'm preparing for art school right now. It just seems that any school that can slap a game design or "interactive media design" degree in their curriculum is trying to scam students who'd love to be game designers, or artists, but don't realize that the degree means nothing.
You dont really have to start as a texture artist (for example) to get a food on the game industry, if you are good enough and you have portfolio suited to work on that field, you will get in sooner or later. I could be wrong, but if my memory serves my right Maciez Kuciara was saying exaclty that not so long ago on his facebook.

As for artschools, knowing how absurdly costly they are in the US, going to one doesnt really seem like a good idea to me. In the case you dont get a scholarship, why put on your back a debt of thousands of dollars when you can learn the same for free, just by having access to the internet.

If you want to work on your fundamentals, go to life drawing sessions in your area, if thats not possible draw your friends/family/whatever or simply grab a mirror and draw yourself.
My point is that you can do and learn everything by yourself.
(10-21-2013, 06:10 AM)EduardoGaray Wrote: [ -> ]You dont really have to start as a texture artist (for example) to get a food on the game industry, if you are good enough and you have portfolio suited to work on that field, you will get in sooner or later. I could be wrong, but if my memory serves my right Maciez Kuciara was saying exaclty that not so long ago on his facebook.

As for artschools, knowing how absurdly costly they are in the US, going to one doesnt really seem like a good idea to me. In the case you dont get a scholarship, why put on your back a debt of thousands of dollars when you can learn the same for free, just by having access to the internet.

If you want to work on your fundamentals, go to life drawing sessions in your area, if thats not possible draw your friends/family/whatever or simply grab a mirror and draw yourself.
My point is that you can do and learn everything by yourself.

I mean, theoretically, one can learn everything an art school can teach by themselves. The only problem is just physically being in an art school would have a better benefit. For instance, the greatest thing about an art school for me would be the huge amount of like minded individuals learning with you. You're living and working with these students, and will get to know their styles, wishes, and work habits. The same can be said with instructors. If I were to stay at my house and learn, I wouldn't be physically living with or seeing anyone else like me. I already take life drawing classes at my local community college, and everyone there is just taking the class for credit, and not as dedicated as myself. The instructor is amazing though.

That, and there's no one really around to help push me out of my comfort zone. It's so easy just to get distracted and get back into a familiar routine, especially because I've lived in the same room for the past 10 years. But if I were to move out to an art college, and dorm with a roommate, then my routine will change drastically. I'll then create a new routine, and with my roommate practically living with me, we could always help each other and push each other to do better. It's much more meaningful and personal when someone who lives with you, and really knows you tells you, rather than an invisible person through a computer screen.

It just sucks, because the way that Noah Bradley says it in his article, it sounds like art school is a phenomenal way to learn, it's just that it's so expensive. That, and how college is always portrayed as this great place. I just feel like not going would be the smartest thing, but not exactly the most enjoyable.
yeah, i guess in the end its just about how do you want to learn and how do you want to live your life. If you think that the school life will suit you better, then go for it!
I went to artschool myself, and i had to leave because everyone there were more focused on smoking pot and partying than in doing art, the instructors themselves were also more interested in partying than in doing anything else too, so maybe i´m a bit biased because of that.
(10-21-2013, 11:26 AM)EduardoGaray Wrote: [ -> ]yeah, i guess in the end its just about how do you want to learn and how do you want to live your life. If you think that the school life will suit you better, then go for it!
I went to artschool myself, and i had to leave because everyone there were more focused on smoking pot and partying than in doing art, the instructors themselves were also more interested in partying than in doing anything else too, so maybe i´m a bit biased because of that.

Really? I do know that a couple of schools do this as well, which is why I'm not bother to apply. Actually, I only really want to go to one school. I went there over the summer for a pre-college program and experienced it for myself. They had a very strict policy on drugs, and almost every class I talked with my professors. They really cared and loved their work.

I just can't fathom not taking that opportunity. But then again, I've never been in debt before, so it's not like I could fathom the penalties from that choice.
(10-21-2013, 11:31 AM)opkluu Wrote: [ -> ]
(10-21-2013, 11:26 AM)EduardoGaray Wrote: [ -> ]yeah, i guess in the end its just about how do you want to learn and how do you want to live your life. If you think that the school life will suit you better, then go for it!
I went to artschool myself, and i had to leave because everyone there were more focused on smoking pot and partying than in doing art, the instructors themselves were also more interested in partying than in doing anything else too, so maybe i´m a bit biased because of that.

Really? I do know that a couple of schools do this as well, which is why I'm not bother to apply. Actually, I only really want to go to one school. I went there over the summer for a pre-college program and experienced it for myself. They had a very strict policy on drugs, and almost every class I talked with my professors. They really cared and loved their work.

I just can't fathom not taking that opportunity. But then again, I've never been in debt before, so it's not like I could fathom the penalties from that choice.

As someone who went to university just to go to university, I'd advise to get into a program pretty close to what you want to do. Don't settle for some ballpark related to what you want to learn. You can learn faster by yourself if you really concentrate. However a relevant art education is very, very valuable. Just be sure it is relevant.