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youve got the like, hogarthe head syndrome, like his heads have the really hard lip lines and overly constructed face. One thing that might help you understand is look and make note of the differences between hogarthes heads and vanderpoel. Vanderpoels are soft and elegant and well designed, use lots of soft edges even in the line work. Hogarths is very robotic shading and extremely structural features. Go more towards Vanderpoel if that makes sense
I think you are doing a fine job with these studies. I agree with Artloader and Felodika that you do not want to be a slave to the construction methods. Personally, I have found that my better portrait drawings have been ones that I have set off on my own path and just put in some basic guidelines rather than work from construction methods. That said, I do work often from construction methods, but I try not be be too rigid with them. I prefer to use Reilly or Loomis heads for study, although I have used both as a starting point for portraits. I think that is fine, as long as you remember that the construction is the firsts phase, and eventually you have to smooth out the sharp lines and add in curves. Plus, you have to allow yourself to move in your own direction at that point. The construction method will only take you so far. It's such a great starting point, as long as it does not hinder the fluidity and essence of the portrait (or figure).

Regarding the struggles you had with the pectoral muscles, I'm not sure what to say about that because the end result looks good to me. It's not a very complex muscle in my opinion. As long as you are aware of where it attaches and how it looks when flexed or stretched, I think you are good. I believe your studies depicting the pec muscles were convincing. I would continue with what you are doing and possibly refer to a good anatomy book for continued guidance.

I registered for Erik Gist's head lay-in streaming class today. I saw your name on the study group and your homework drawings. Nice stuff. I'm looking forward to getting started with the videos. I have to play catch up and watch the first few classes in the next week since I joined late. I'm still waiting for my order to finish processes. Hopefully I will receive a confirmation email tomorrow and I can begin watching the the first class tomorrow night.

Good luck with your studies. I look forward to seeing more of your work. Nice stuff so far!
(10-22-2018, 08:52 AM)Fedodika Wrote: [ -> ]youve got the like, hogarthe head syndrome, like his heads have the really hard lip lines and overly constructed face. One thing that might help you understand is look and make note of the differences between hogarthes heads and vanderpoel. Vanderpoels are soft and elegant and well designed, use lots of soft edges even in the line work. Hogarths is very robotic shading and extremely structural features. Go more towards Vanderpoel if that makes sense

Fuuny that my drawings are simillar to Hogarths seeing as how I haven't studied his book apart from a couple of head lay-ins. I know exactly what you mean making that comparison, so far I've only really studied Vanderpoel's eyes, still need to study his drawings of the other features and faces as a whole which I've been meaning to do for awhile now.

Once these 2 live streaming classes end in December I was planning on just studying Jeff's, Erik's etc head and figure lay-ins/drawings for the following month, I can easily include a bunch of Vanderpoel master studies aswell, study how they interpret things and hopefully that will ingrain itself in me and improve my drawings, atleast I hope.
(10-22-2018, 10:46 AM)Shinkasuru Wrote: [ -> ]I think you are doing a fine job with these studies. I agree with Artloader and Felodika that you do not want to be a slave to the construction methods. Personally, I have found that my better portrait drawings have been ones that I have set off on my own path and just put in some basic guidelines rather than work from construction methods. That said, I do work often from construction methods, but I try not be be too rigid with them. I prefer to use Reilly or Loomis heads for study, although I have used both as a starting point for portraits. I think that is fine, as long as you remember that the construction is the firsts phase, and eventually you have to smooth out the sharp lines and add in curves. Plus, you have to allow yourself to move in your own direction at that point. The construction method will only take you so far. It's such a great starting point, as long as it does not hinder the fluidity and essence of the portrait (or figure).

Regarding the struggles you had with the pectoral muscles, I'm not sure what to say about that because the end result looks good to me. It's not a very complex muscle in my opinion. As long as you are aware of where it attaches and how it looks when flexed or stretched, I think you are good. I believe your studies depicting the pec muscles were convincing. I would continue with what you are doing and possibly refer to a good anatomy book for continued guidance.

I registered for Erik Gist's head lay-in streaming class today. I saw your name on the study group and your homework drawings. Nice stuff. I'm looking forward to getting started with the videos. I have to play catch up and watch the first few classes in the next week since I joined late. I'm still waiting for my order to finish processes. Hopefully I will receive a confirmation email tomorrow and I can begin watching the the first class tomorrow night.

Good luck with your studies. I look forward to seeing more of your work. Nice stuff so far!
Hey Shinkasuru thanks for stopping by. I seem to be finding it hard to break from that path of relying purely on the underlining construction, as you have all said I should be aware of it but not be a slave to it, just not sure how to break away from the cycle. I'll see if I can spend an afternoon watching Eriks and Jeff complete a full portrait drawing and make notes on how they draw, when they use construction and when they break away from it etc might make something click on my head.
Regarding the pecs, atleast I'm on the right path just felt like I was not understanding where it attaches on the forearm, i know it's beneath the deltoid but felt like I wasn't aware of when the arm was turned away if that makes sense?
Nice to see you've signed up to Erik's class how are you finding it so far? You should post in the group chat over on Watt's forums as it's rather quite haha.
Some stuff from this week.

Life drawing

Felt like my gesture drawings are better than previous weeks, still got along way to go with them but I feel like I'm improving although my proportions still seem to be all over the place, need to watch more of Proko's figure drawing lessons since he covers alot of concepts.

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For the last drawing I tried incorporating what I was practicing last weeks in Brian's class and construct the arms better, think they are an improvement but need to learn the arm anatomy since the arms still feel stiff to me.
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Didn't go to my portrait class this week, wanted to spend more time on Erik's h/w but had a really bad day whre my hand just wasn't listening to my head so had to spend Wednesday working on the h/w.

Erik's Homework

Still can't manage a full lay-in in 20 mins, tried working quicker and completed all of these in 30 mins but that still felt abit too quick for me. Still feel like I'm copying rather than interpreting the ref which I've asked Erik about, hopefully he can give me some pointers.

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Brian's Homework

Spent more time on these compared to last week trying to fully understand it, working on legs this week. I feel like I understand the process but now I just need to practice it, like alot.

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Some studies based off Brian's demo.

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Other Stuff

Still spending my time on Monday's working on my quick sketch skills and understanding the Reilly figure abstraction.

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Spent some time on Saturday working from imagination. Fucked up the straight on view of the face and made the eyes far too wide, looks like a fish....... Need to work on different angles apart from the 3 basics, prob a good time to go back to Loomis and study that until I can draw heads from different angles.

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Lastly a basic head lay-in from my female head. Bought the male version as I wanted to copy the warm up routine from Erik's class and spend 20 mins drawing the head from different angles. Thinking of buying some wigs and eyebrows and applying them to these models since they are both bald.

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still think youd benefit from more quick and reckless type of sketches to loosen yourself up; i feel like you have the right idea on a lot of things you just need to get more volume in quicker but thats just my speculation and im not 100% on the validity of that
(10-29-2018, 09:29 AM)Fedodika Wrote: [ -> ]still think youd benefit from more quick and reckless type of sketches to loosen yourself up; i feel like you have the right idea on a lot of things you just need to get more volume in quicker but thats just my speculation and im not 100% on the validity of that

Are you talking about more figure and head quick sketch like 2,3,5 min figs and 5 min heads or 20 min head and fig lay ins? or both?

I have the female and male head from planes of the head that I am going to use to mimic the 20 min warm up from Erik's class and replace my usual warm up with that instead.
Got the week off work so I'm planning on getting more work than usual done. Planning on doing some more full value work and work on my figure construction.

Went to the morning life drawing class today which is 3 hours compared to the usual 2 hour class I attend.

For the 5 min gestures I tried relying less on the reilly abstraction and just drawing what was in front of me and just quickly judging distances by eye.

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My 15 min drawings where shockingly bad, still can't draw lying down poses, does anyone have any pointers for them? The foreshortening on the bottom drawing was a bitch, kept misjudging the distances.

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Had longer to work on the final drawing so just focued on trying to get a full figure lay-in and applying what I've bene learning so far from Brian's class. Pose wasn't very dynamic (as you can see), looks like a mummy hahaha.

[attachment=109709]

Had to run some personal errands today aswell as tomorrow so will most likely only be able to have time for my figure and portrait classes, Wednesday onwards I should be free to work to my hearts content.
i mean like try some different approach like using ONLY compressed charcoal or building form with scribbles, you know try to see other dimensions of drawing in different mediums
@Peter: Some nice studies you have here. I do agree with your own admission that your laying pose needs some work. I also feel the last pose with the rotund lady languishing in the chair feels awkward. It doesn't look natural. Granted, the model might have looked like that, but it just looked a little strange to me. Too stiff. But I do like the way you drew through the leg. I love seeing those construction lines and getting a feel for the form.

I respect what you are doing here and I am very much into this academic form of art and the style of construction used by artists like Bargue, Jeff Watts, Erik Gist, and Ron Lemen, to name a few. I think the Reilly method is super useful and I use it all the time. That said, however, I feel you need to break away from the academic art instruction sometimes and just be free with your pencil (or stylus). Allow yourself to sit there for 30 mins at the computer or with a sketchpad and pencil and do a bunch of fast drawings. You can use some basic construction like Loomis or Reilly, but be free with your drawing and loose. Don't think too much. I find that Reilly and Loomis, although they are great methods for beginning any portrait, some of the best drawings I have completed have been just starting with a few basic guidelines and then just using some comparative measurement and sighting to find the placement of my landmarks.

What I'm trying to say is, keep learning from all these great artists and practicing. Just don't be a slave to these methods. Try starting a portrait some time with just an eye and build it out from there. Or just sketch in a crosshair for the brow and midline and go from there. You can always return to the construction methods whenever you want to, but I think it's nice to break things up a little and try something new sometimes.

Regarding Erik's 20-minute lay-in class, I'm liking it, although it's not what I expected. I guess I thought the entire class each week would be instructional, and the warmups would only last a few minutes. Still, I am finding it informative, although I would prefer a little more instruction. I hope he touches on his methods for laying in shadow patterns. Although even if he doesn't, it does seem self explanatory. I drew along with one of his videos the other day and found it was a great learning experience to go through the steps Erik went through in the video. I think I will definitely get something out of it. I did't care too much for the last one (yesterday's class). But there are many more to come and I expect to get something out of it.

Did you save the reference images for the first two classes (10/8 and 10/15)? I joined late and was not able to save the reference images (if there were any at all).

Keep up the great work. I'm really enjoying your studies. I love this method of construction. Loomis and Reilly two of the best artists to learn from about form and construction. In fact, I started off with Loomis and it wasn't until I started applying Reilly over the Loomis construction that I finally started to get past issues I was experiencing, especially with three-quater view.
totally agree^ and yea Peter, sooner or later youre gonna figure this stuff out and youre gonna have to start finding it is what you exactly want to draw. Id reccomend making a list, and this is more personal. Just write words of visual things you like, be it fantasy, certain video games or films, sci fi, women, men, animals etc. And start really finding what it is exactly you want to do with your fundamental skills once they are locked in place.

I spent the earlier part of my development doing that, now i have to figure out the fundamental stuff.

Once youve made that list, start finding artists who do that stuff and build your visual library even if youre just looking. And lastly, as mentioned above, do some quick scribbles of stuff; I hate how fucking methodical this sounds but we are artists and you gotta have some you know, creativity here and there. Dont spend a ton of time on it, just get the idea down and move on :)
(10-31-2018, 11:00 AM)Shinkasuru Wrote: [ -> ]@Peter: Some nice studies you have here. I do agree with your own admission that your laying pose needs some work. I also feel the last pose with the rotund lady languishing in the chair feels awkward. It doesn't look natural. Granted, the model might have looked like that, but it just looked a little strange to me. Too stiff. But I do like the way you drew through the leg. I love seeing those construction lines and getting a feel for the form.

I respect what you are doing here and I am very much into this academic form of art and the style of construction used by artists like Bargue, Jeff Watts, Erik Gist, and Ron Lemen, to name a few. I think the Reilly method is super useful and I use it all the time. That said, however, I feel you need to break away from the academic art instruction sometimes and just be free with your pencil (or stylus).  Allow yourself to sit there for 30 mins at the computer or with a sketchpad and pencil and do a bunch of fast drawings. You can use some basic construction like Loomis or Reilly, but be free with your drawing and loose. Don't think too much. I find that Reilly and Loomis, although they are great methods for beginning any portrait, some of the best drawings I have completed have been just starting with a few basic guidelines and then just using some comparative measurement and sighting to find the placement of my landmarks.

What I'm trying to say is, keep learning from all these great artists and practicing. Just don't be a slave to these methods. Try starting a portrait some time with just an eye and build it out from there. Or just sketch in a crosshair for the brow and midline and go from there. You can always return to the construction methods whenever you want to, but I think it's nice to break things up a little and try something new sometimes.

Regarding Erik's 20-minute lay-in class, I'm liking it, although it's not what I expected. I guess I thought the entire class each week would be instructional, and the warmups would only last a few minutes. Still, I am finding it informative, although I would prefer a little more instruction. I hope he touches on his methods for laying in shadow patterns. Although even if he doesn't, it does seem self explanatory. I drew along with one of his videos the other day and found it was a great learning experience to go through the steps Erik went through in the video. I think I will definitely get something out of it. I did't care too much for the last one (yesterday's class). But there are many more to come and I expect to get something out of it.

Did you save the reference images for the first two classes (10/8 and 10/15)? I joined late and was not able to save the reference images (if there were any at all).

Keep up the great work. I'm really enjoying your studies. I love this method of construction. Loomis and Reilly two of the best artists to learn from about form and construction. In fact, I started off with Loomis and it wasn't until I started applying Reilly over the Loomis construction that I finally started to get past issues I was experiencing, especially with three-quater view.

Yh I should of drew the cushions she was sitting on as that might of helped ground the figure better, it was such a stiff pose that I found it rather difficult to make it look more exciting. I don't know why but for these long poses they never have the model sitting in an actual chair, we have plenty but the perso who runs the classes always insists that if they do sit it be on the platform they use, even though that means we are looking way down on them rather than being eye level.

I can see where you and Fedodika are coming from, tbh for awhile now I wouldn't say I've lost interest but sometimes it can take me awhile to get into drawing. Like I'll think to myself "oh man I've got to construct this portrait via Loomis method, or draw these basic shapes etc", I think what I'm trying to say is that I've lost the part of art making where I just don't put pressure on myself, relax and just draw for the fun of it.

I still want to continue learning the construction apprach but perhaps like you said mix it up abit, keep a skecthbook and experiment with different mediums or appraches and don't worry about producing a good drawing.

Yh I know what you mean about Erik's classes, think the instructional portion only lasts about 25 mins or something but I'm not complaining. :) I believe he said he will go over how he maps out a drawing in the next couple of weeks or so, didn't realize that the first 4-5 weeks would be focusing on construction.

P.S I'll pm you the ref for the first 2 classes.

Thanks as usual :)
(10-31-2018, 10:49 PM)Fedodika Wrote: [ -> ]totally agree^ and yea Peter, sooner or later youre gonna figure this stuff out and youre gonna have to start finding it is what you exactly want to draw. Id reccomend making a list, and this is more personal. Just write words of visual things you like, be it fantasy, certain video games or films, sci fi, women, men, animals etc. And start really finding what it is exactly you want to do with your fundamental skills once they are locked in place.

I spent the earlier part of my development doing that, now i have to figure out the fundamental stuff.

Once youve made that list, start finding artists who do that stuff and build your visual library even if youre just looking. And lastly, as mentioned above, do some quick scribbles of stuff; I hate how fucking methodical this sounds but we are artists and you gotta have some you know, creativity here and there. Dont spend a ton of time on it, just get the idea down and move on :)

Fuuny you should mention making a list as I actually made myself one awhile back where I gathered a bunch of ref from artists I like, made a list of what exactly I liked about them and then cross referenced those lists to see what terms or phrases kept popping up.

I have a hard copy lying around somewhere, not too sure if I have the word document saved or not since I reinstalled windows a few months back, might of got deleted. If it has I'll make a new one and post it (if that's possible).

I think I've just been so caught up on getting good and make a living out of it that I lost sight of just producing art for my own enjoyment. I've got a new sketchbook so I'll give what you and Shinkasuru suggested ago tomorrow and do some experimenting.

Thanks for the advice as always man.! :)
Been in abit of a slump this week so that's why I haven't been posting. Every time I sat down to draw I just couldn't seem to draw, it was like my hand wouldn't listen to my brain so I'd go to lay-in a straight line but the my hand would draw some wonky ass line. Or if I was doing some comparative measuring, no matter how any times I tried I couldn't get it right, you can see it in some of drawings, especially the fig lay-ins.

Just really annoyed I randomly got into this slump, especially since I had the week off. :( Think I'm putting too much pressure on myself and being wayyyy too hard on myself.

Anyway enough ranting.

Some gesture drawings. Figs are from photo ref and the heads are from the plastic models that I own.

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Erik's Homework

Didn't realize that we were still focusing on construction, people are probably tired of seeing it but here's more construction since that is what he asked us to do.

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Did a study of his demo. I'm being conscious of using the side of my pencil more, thought I had been but looking at my work compared to Erik's I musn't be using the side enough.

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Brian's Homework

Some studies of Brian's drawings. This week is torso's so spent extra time on these studies and the h/w itse;f to properly understand it.

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Homework

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Fig lay-ins

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You can see it in these 2 especially how bad of a week I was having.

Tomorrow I'm going to just experiment in my sketchbook, draw what's around me etc and have some fun like what was suggested above.
yea bro, i recently read juliete atrides lessons from classical atelier and one thing she emphasizes is that a master will leave his drawing light as long as possible to ensure accuracy. A hard line draws attention, theres no award for nailing all your lines right away, and i think thats holding you back.

Hell it might even do you some good to play or study caricature for a while to get yourself in a different headspace and loosen up. I think you are noticing from erik that yes the side of the pencil is the gold spot, ONLY save those dark lines for late in the process. And like on the old fellow erik drew next to yours, he pushes the eye sockets, his forms are just more robust more angular.

Study different types of styles, like cartoon, i really like the kinda nsfw artist inputwo, and his style is so tasty and free flowing. Studying his work and other cartoonish artists helps me push stuff in realism and find better shapes. This guy is obsessed with design, all he cares about is finding the absolute sexiest shape for a leg or butt. I remember when he was just starting now ppl are doing 3d scultpures of his stuff. If you can push it all the way, itll look too floppy, if you do what you do, and go for accuracy only it gets too stiff, try to see both worlds

https://www.artstation.com/inputwo

Heres a free book on caricature, try to just go wild man get stupid kinda like my early stuff, just super whimsical and boneless, i know it sounds counter intuitive but for you specifically i think itd help

https://vk.com/doc-54852533_320642789?dl...51b57f2fdc
@Peter: Regarding your slump, it's going to happen no matter what you do. It happens to the best, be it artists or professional baseball players. That said, however, you can be engendering the slump by putting unneeded pressure on yourself. You can work hard at your practice without having to put so much pressure on yourself to draw so perfectly or draw like a particular person. I notice in some of your postings you will sometimes compare your drawings to Brian's or Erik's. First, these guys have been working artists for many years; second, you are not them. You will develop your own unique style, incorporating what you have learned from these guys and others, and what you discover on your own.

I definitely suggest a mix of deliberate construction studies and then just some free flowing exercises where you start a portrait from an eye or nose, or the figure from a limb even. All you have learned from your construction practice will help guide you.

I am 100% for building up a drawing or painting using one of the construction methods. i use it all the time. Just don't be so reliant on it that you can't produce without it.

Believe me, I know what you are feeling. I have gone through it many times before with my sculpting. Eventually I stopped comparing myself to others and stopped studying other artists' designs as much as I used to (still referred to other artists' work for inspiration), and started referencing nature and developing my own style.

I think your studies are looking great. The portraits and the figures. Keep working hard. It's paying off.

Got your PM. Thanks. I sent you my email.
(11-05-2018, 10:16 AM)Fedodika Wrote: [ -> ]yea bro, i recently read juliete atrides lessons from classical atelier and one thing she emphasizes is that a master will leave his drawing light as long as possible to ensure accuracy. A hard line draws attention, theres no award for nailing all your lines right away, and i think thats holding you back.

Hell it might even do you some good to play or study caricature for a while to get yourself in a different headspace and loosen up. I think you are noticing from erik that yes the side of the pencil is the gold spot, ONLY save those dark lines for late in the process. And like on the old fellow erik drew next to yours, he pushes the eye sockets, his forms are just more robust more angular.

Study different types of styles, like cartoon, i really like the kinda nsfw artist inputwo, and his style is so tasty and free flowing. Studying his work and other cartoonish artists helps me push stuff in realism and find better shapes. This guy is obsessed with design, all he cares about is finding the absolute sexiest shape for a leg or butt. I remember when he was just starting now ppl are doing 3d scultpures of his stuff. If you can push it all the way, itll look too floppy, if you do what you do, and go for accuracy only it gets too stiff, try to see both worlds

https://www.artstation.com/inputwo

Heres a free book on caricature, try to just go wild man get stupid kinda like my early stuff, just super whimsical and boneless, i know it sounds counter intuitive but for you specifically i think itd help

https://vk.com/doc-54852533_320642789?dl...51b57f2fdc


Haven't read Juliete's book in so long I should really go back to it.......... I normally start my laying-in lightly and once I'm happy with how it's all looking that is when I start laying-in those dark lines trying to emulate how Brian and Erik etc do their drawings but haven't got the hang of it yet (clearly). Still wrestling with the side of the pencil sometimes, notice it the most when I fill in tone, it takes me a few tries before I hit the sweet spot.

For awhile now I've been meaning to devote some time to master studies, do a shit ton of drawigns and try and emulate what they do in my own work just not enough hours in the day! Once these lessons finish mid Dec I have around 2 weeks off from work so I want to spend that entire 2 weeks just cranking out master studies and maybe even some plein air painting and perhaps some master studies of paintings.

Checked that artstation link and my god are those girls thiccccc haha, I can see what you mean by how he pushes those shapes to the extremes, tbh I don't want to push my drawings that far but obviously I need to push them to some degree.

I like your idea of studying some caricature (thanks for the link btw) I feell ike that would be a good way to help me loosen up alongside some more quick sketching and master studies. :) Tbh I felt abit directionless when I tried loosening up last week which I'll explain more when I post my work.
(11-06-2018, 10:29 PM)Shinkasuru Wrote: [ -> ]@Peter: Regarding your slump, it's going to happen no matter what you do. It happens to the best, be it artists or professional baseball players. That said, however, you can be engendering the slump by putting unneeded pressure on yourself. You can work hard at your practice without having to put so much pressure on yourself to draw so perfectly or draw like a particular person. I notice in some of your postings you will sometimes compare your drawings to Brian's or Erik's. First, these guys have been working artists for many years; second, you are not them. You will develop your own unique style, incorporating what you have learned from these guys and others, and what you discover on your own.

I definitely suggest a mix of deliberate construction studies and then just some free flowing exercises where you start a portrait from an eye or nose, or the figure from a limb even. All you have learned from your construction practice will help guide you.

I am 100% for building up a drawing or painting using one of the construction methods. i use it all the time. Just don't be so reliant on it that you can't produce without it.

Believe me, I know what you are feeling. I have gone through it many times before with my sculpting. Eventually I stopped comparing myself to others and stopped studying other artists' designs as much as I used to (still referred to other artists' work for inspiration), and started referencing nature and developing my own style.

I think your studies are looking great. The portraits and the figures. Keep working hard. It's paying off.

Got your PM. Thanks. I sent you my email.
Yh I know slumps happen, think I was just extra annoyed that I had a week off work and felt like it was kind of a waste. I'm just too overly critical on myself, always have been. I think it's mainly because like everyone here (well most) I want to get to a professional level and make a living doing what I want to do, I know you get to that level when you get there all you can do is practice, some people get their quicker than others. I just tend to worry about other things such as making enough money in the meantime to live off and how much longer it will take etc, I just need to try and silence those worries.
I'll give what you said ago this week if I can (have alot less time this week) might have to be on the weekend of next week, as you said I'll try a drawing from the eye first of another facial feature etc and see how it goes and if my drawigns are any looser, I'll try and not use the abstraction lines aswell and just go by comparative measurement instead.
I definitely compare my work to other artists way too much only becuase I want to get to the same level but as you said I'm wayyy too hard at times.
Thanks for such a lengthy response aswell. :)
Been really busy the last few days so didn't really have time to post or take photos so only really have the homeworks for both classes and some loose drawing in my sketchbook like people suggested. Still atteneded my portrait and life drawing classes but had a tough time focusing so my work was all over the place. I'll try and take photos this week and post them next week at some point.

Erik's Homework

Only had time this week to complete 2 drawings, this week was taking the drawing to the 2 value stage, tried being looser this week and not correcting some of my lines as much as usual e..g if a line was abit messy I tried to leave it. Didn;t use the Reilly abstraction as much, still ayed in the head like i normally would by laying down the head with the oddly shaped triangle (think Hamptons book shows this) and then only using one or 2 of the abstraction lines such as the brow rythm. Only put in things like the cheek rythm and muzzle rthym at the end to see if I was in the ball park regarding placement of features, mostly relied on comparative measuring. Not sure if my drawings look any looser than normall, I'll let you decide.

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Brian's Homework

This week we were completing some master studies based on some of the instructors drawings (not just Brian's work). Tried breaking it down fully to see if I fully understood what I was drawing. I did use the side of my pencil for the inital lay-in but not enough when laying in some of harder lines so my line variation is still not the best.

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Experimenting

Tried doing some loose sketching in my sketchbook, mainly just drew things around me and trying different approaches e.g. for the fallout bobble head I tried some continuous line drawing, some 1 min and 30 sec poses and then tried them again but without lifitng my pencil of the page. Same with the page of some drawings of my cat, just trying to get the general impression of what I was drawing and then moving on so didn't use a rubber either. Lastly tried laying some tree branches in tonely.

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Not sure if I took too much away from it all, think the main thing I noticed was that my hand eye coordination has improved greatly, I remember last time I did a continuous line drawing my proportions were all over the place but now they were pretty damn good. I'll try what the others said this week or next week and see if that makes something click in my head.

Working extra hours all this week so will most likely only ave time for my classes and homeworks so wil try and post on the weekend.

P.s I keep forgetting to post my crits from the live streaming, I've been waching them and making notes but keep forgetting to do draw overs and post, I'll try and remember for next week.
youre getting better Peter, the asian woman head lay ins are nice, specially the second one. keep on with the loose scribblies, pip boy stuff i like the headspace itll get you in. brian homework is gettin there too, more bulk on the deltoid and forearm!
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