Bookend's Sketchbook
Heyo :)

Love the limited tone grayscale studies! However you get it done, as logn as you keep going you're doing greattt!
Reply
ari: Heya!   Thanks for the support! Grin   Yeah, the swamp studies were definitely a brush issue.  Luckily, I've been discovering and getting to know Krita and its brushes pretty well, so hopefully my studies will be looking smoother.  It's still a bit of a challenge, though.

dodeqaa:  Thanks!  Yes!  Must.. Keep .. GOING.  GOING.  GOIIINNGGGG!! Thumbs_up

-----------------------------------------------------------------------

I've done a lot of grayscale studies in the past, but not near enough colour, so I thought I'd tackle that a bit, amidst all this perspective madness.

Got a bit of a WIP here.  I know it's kinda against the law of awesome to use colour picker-- But what if I'm only using it on the colours I've already chosen by myself, in order to blend darker or lighter, and make it smoother?  Not really sure how else to blend.  Tips on blending would be good.  Otherwise I will be looking up tips.  I'm avoiding the blur/smudge tools, but maybe I'll give them a go.  At least at the end, for clean-up?  Dunno.

This is not even halfway, as far as I'm concerned.  Those hood tendrils are gonna be fuuunnnn.  Grin


Attached Files Image(s)



Sketchblag

 Join our Study Group: The Velvet Revolvers!  Let's work hard together!
Reply
whoa! you've been busy! the work you've done for amit's class is look really good, the studies especially.

this isn't really a crit, just something I had fun with;

for the black and white notan sketches, I noticed you could cut back in more with the eraser, at the moment it looks like you're working white onto black, or black onto white, and stopping there, wheras you could do that still, but then cut back and forth, work the eraser in, cut black back over, cut back in the the eraser again, switch back and forth as you go - just sometimes gives you more interesting shapes and it's kinda nice to work that way too.

great stuff though, your studies from the originals look spot on!

Reply
Those thumbnails looks crazy good. You've taken leaps and strides since you started.

Scream at what I'm doing wrong in my sketchbook
it helps a lot
Reply
Nice to see what youve been up to man, keep it up.

Reply
lurch:  Thanks so much!  Awesome tips, too.  I agree, I should erase more.  I'm basically afraid of making lines, and when I actually do, I make them scratchy and messy.  I think I should try blocking in my forms first and focus on precision.  This is something I'm struggling with right now, because of my ADD, and my impatience with my work.

Vornag: Aww, that means a lot man.  I can't really see the improvement, honestly.  Most people aren't seeing a lot of the work I've done.  My awesome stuff is on page 2-- This is the quality of work I should be doing, not just with my studies, but my imaginative works as well...  I just feel like I've hit a wall, and sometimes it seems like I'll never get through it.

Sketchosoph:  You are far too kind, lol.

crackedskull:  Thanks man, I'll try.  Grin

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Some of you may have already read my weekly review on Velvet Revolvers, but if not... Well, I haven't been doing too well the last two weeks.  My work has been rushed and childish, and I've been reticent to actually do any work at all.

I think that I will force myself to do some work everyday, even if it's just a scribble.  Eventually, my patience will increase again.  I'm just not going to let myself go on an 8 month hiatus again.  That does not help my work at all.

Don't be nice to me, lol, say it like it is.  My work is rushed and crappy right now, and I know it.  I know I need to put more time into each thing... But, I'm going through a phase.

Anyway, here's the stuff I've been posting in Velvet but failed to post here.

And some extra little messy paint comics from an idea generator, lol.


Attached Files Image(s)





Sketchblag

 Join our Study Group: The Velvet Revolvers!  Let's work hard together!
Reply
Working on a background with Gabriel Knight 3: Blood of the Sacred, Blood of the Damned.

We're trying to make it 2d, like the first game.  I, of course, suck at perspective, so it's kind of amusing that I'm doing backgrounds...  But, it's a good way to learn, and if we ever finish this, it'll be released for free, so...   Yeah.  Grin

But any tips on values and perspective are appreciated. This is my first time actually using and referencing material against a perspective grid (with the help of a perspective brush recommended by Amit)..

It's looking really simple and kind of cartoony.  I'm also really worried about values and how to deal with lighting that's bouncing around a room and making realistic shades...  I am completely clueless.

So, I've been cleaning this up and trying to get the simple shapes down, and..  Generally banging my head against the wall a bit.

This is supposed to be a hotel room, the first screen in the game. There's a really tacky wallpaper and carpet too, but I'm not really sure how to lay them down correct-like.


Attached Files Image(s)



Sketchblag

 Join our Study Group: The Velvet Revolvers!  Let's work hard together!
Reply
Yo, Bookend! 

So firstly, how long do ya reckon you're spending on each piece? Seeing as you're calling them messy and unfinished.
Hmm, I'm not gonna be hard on ya because we all go through shiz like this whilst trying to git gud at art. 
Honestly, I used to feel the same way as you did a while back. But the thing I realised was: I didn't know how to finish pieces. I feel like this could be part of the problem for ya. It was only when I was forced to do master studies and eventually when I was commissioned for a couple of things did I realise that there are levels of finish I didn't even think about naturally. Meaning, I never realised rendering a piece could take as long a week, or two, or a month!

Mmmmmm, so a solution to this for you... Here's some things I found that really helped me pay more attention to studies, which inadvertently changed up how I work on things from imagination/personal work etc. 

> Shape/Form
Among the 3 major elements of painting that = the most important in making fundamentally good art.
Being able to paint shapes under any lighting scenario and providing the shape with a 3D feel - that's what's up.
This is the skill you'll need to work on to be able to paint pretty much anything from mind (if you have a solid visual library which, haha, is another story as you may already know)
Some methods on how to improve on painting shapes: Paint them simple shapes - sphere, cube, cylinder etc under different lighting conditions. If you don't have any on hand, I about myself some little kids building blocks made of wood and painted the sphere (what I need to work on the most) with white gouache and observe that when I'm not doing anything. Wireframes - just like in a 3D program, think about shape and form like you're a 3D program. Wireframes wrap around shape and distinctly show the planes of a shape. This'll help with your visualisation of where to paint light in and understanding of the intensity of light used - as well as (and more importantly) help you visualise more complex shapes in 3D from your mind.
 
> Values/Colours
Values = the key word when thinking about colour. Good values = everything. 
Another of the 3 that helps to make fundamentally good art.
If you can pick the right colour just by looking at a master painting or something from irl from your mind and are able to apply that knowledge to your own work or studies... not only will you improve on the amount of colours to can actually see, it'll also help you understand how subtle changes in value can turn a form in space. Also, think about this: f you can see colours more effectively, whatever you visualise in your head - you'll be able to put down in PS. When you try to study, don't just be lazy be satisfied with a colour that is close to what is actually in the master painting. Really try to get it spot on! Otherwise, there's no point to the study. You don't really need to get the colours 100% exact when working with photos, however. With photos, you should be trying to make informed design decisions on what colours would simulate real life more than what the photo displays, e.g. there's more colour in shadow other than black. In many cases, try a more saturated dark red or blue or purple. Etc. It's dependent on where your figures/objects are situated, alongside what materials you're painting.
Some methods on how to improve on seeing colours: lots of thumbnails of either master art - I'm talking the oldschool traditional guys (portraits and enviros), not to mention value thumbs of these as well. Colour thumbs of a still life in different lighting before you tackle a still life study. Drawing a lot also does wonders. There are numerous ways of working on this skill.

 Did I just read you say that you "suck at perspective"? Well, guess what the 3rd fundamental element is?

> Perspective
Now, perspective is uber important. It's effin' everywhere. It relates to everything. It's even in faces.
If you have a good understanding of shape/form - perspective becomes easier. 
I'm just gonna use KJG as an example for this. You know why Kim Jung Gi is so amazeballs at drawing from his mind with permanent materials? He has absolutely and without a doubt mastered his understanding of perspective. He draws one figure in certain pov and then is able to draw the other 10-50 characters/object in a state of flow, while remaining on the same rules of perspective in which he drew the first character! 
The thing to learn here is that, he drew and drew and drew objects, people, anything and everything in different angles and rotations. By doing this he solidified what an object looks like in every single pov possible. Thus, ranking up his visualisation skills from zero to hero.

I just want you to realise that, by thinking about these things (and then some when you think about the other elements and principles of design in your art) - your study process and art making process will slow the fck down - because painting now has a goal. There's now a checklist that you're thinking about constantly... and if you're thinking in this way, considering all these elements - you'll realise that every stroke counts!
Eventually you'll get faster, believe me. 
But as you start out, thinking about this stuff - hell, it's gonna take a while! And I don't want you to give in because you think you're working too slowly. Speed doesn't matter at this point.
Now if you're gonna give up on a study, make sure that it's only because you've learned all that you can with it. You got in and got out with what you wanted to learn! That's fine! 
But don't just give up on it because it's taking too long!! 

Alrighty Bookend there's my couple-a cents for the taking, I hope I've helped you out, even if just a little bit - then I'll be happy.

Have a good one and keep pushing---! <3 <3
Reply
(10-12-2015, 07:54 AM)smrr Wrote: Yo, Bookend! 

So firstly, how long do ya reckon you're spending on each piece? Seeing as you're calling them messy and unfinished.
Hmm, I'm not gonna be hard on ya because we all go through shiz like this whilst trying to git gud at art. 
Honestly, I used to feel the same way as you did a while back. But the thing I realised was: I didn't know how to finish pieces. I feel like this could be part of the problem for ya. It was only when I was forced to do master studies and eventually when I was commissioned for a couple of things did I realise that there are levels of finish I didn't even think about naturally. Meaning, I never realised rendering a piece could take as long a week, or two, or a month!

Mmmmmm, so a solution to this for you... Here's some things I found that really helped me pay more attention to studies, which inadvertently changed up how I work on things from imagination/personal work etc. 

> Shape/Form
Among the 3 major elements of painting that = the most important in making fundamentally good art.
Being able to paint shapes under any lighting scenario and providing the shape with a 3D feel - that's what's up.
This is the skill you'll need to work on to be able to paint pretty much anything from mind (if you have a solid visual library which, haha, is another story as you may already know)
Some methods on how to improve on painting shapes: Paint them simple shapes - sphere, cube, cylinder etc under different lighting conditions. If you don't have any on hand, I about myself some little kids building blocks made of wood and painted the sphere (what I need to work on the most) with white gouache and observe that when I'm not doing anything. Wireframes - just like in a 3D program, think about shape and form like you're a 3D program. Wireframes wrap around shape and distinctly show the planes of a shape. This'll help with your visualisation of where to paint light in and understanding of the intensity of light used - as well as (and more importantly) help you visualise more complex shapes in 3D from your mind.
 
> Values/Colours
Values = the key word when thinking about colour. Good values = everything. 
Another of the 3 that helps to make fundamentally good art.
If you can pick the right colour just by looking at a master painting or something from irl from your mind and are able to apply that knowledge to your own work or studies... not only will you improve on the amount of colours to can actually see, it'll also help you understand how subtle changes in value can turn a form in space. Also, think about this: f you can see colours more effectively, whatever you visualise in your head - you'll be able to put down in PS. When you try to study, don't just be lazy be satisfied with a colour that is close to what is actually in the master painting. Really try to get it spot on! Otherwise, there's no point to the study. You don't really need to get the colours 100% exact when working with photos, however. With photos, you should be trying to make informed design decisions on what colours would simulate real life more than what the photo displays, e.g. there's more colour in shadow other than black. In many cases, try a more saturated dark red or blue or purple. Etc. It's dependent on where your figures/objects are situated, alongside what materials you're painting.
Some methods on how to improve on seeing colours: lots of thumbnails of either master art - I'm talking the oldschool traditional guys (portraits and enviros), not to mention value thumbs of these as well. Colour thumbs of a still life in different lighting before you tackle a still life study. Drawing a lot also does wonders. There are numerous ways of working on this skill.

 Did I just read you say that you "suck at perspective"? Well, guess what the 3rd fundamental element is?

> Perspective
Now, perspective is uber important. It's effin' everywhere. It relates to everything. It's even in faces.
If you have a good understanding of shape/form - perspective becomes easier. 
I'm just gonna use KJG as an example for this. You know why Kim Jung Gi is so amazeballs at drawing from his mind with permanent materials? He has absolutely and without a doubt mastered his understanding of perspective. He draws one figure in certain pov and then is able to draw the other 10-50 characters/object in a state of flow, while remaining on the same rules of perspective in which he drew the first character! 
The thing to learn here is that, he drew and drew and drew objects, people, anything and everything in different angles and rotations. By doing this he solidified what an object looks like in every single pov possible. Thus, ranking up his visualisation skills from zero to hero.

I just want you to realise that, by thinking about these things (and then some when you think about the other elements and principles of design in your art) - your study process and art making process will slow the fck down - because painting now has a goal. There's now a checklist that you're thinking about constantly... and if you're thinking in this way, considering all these elements - you'll realise that every stroke counts!
Eventually you'll get faster, believe me. 
But as you start out, thinking about this stuff - hell, it's gonna take a while! And I don't want you to give in because you think you're working too slowly. Speed doesn't matter at this point.
Now if you're gonna give up on a study, make sure that it's only because you've learned all that you can with it. You got in and got out with what you wanted to learn! That's fine! 
But don't just give up on it because it's taking too long!! 

Alrighty Bookend there's my couple-a cents for the taking, I hope I've helped you out, even if just a little bit - then I'll be happy.

Have a good one and keep pushing---! <3 <3

Thanks so much for all the hard work you've likely put into this trying to help me.  It's really appreciated!  These are the areas I struggle with, and am trying to better myself in.

I need you to know that I've done master studies...  I've done them very well.  I've nailed down shapes, values, and perspective within them perfectly.  Here's some examples: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-5...l#pid75844

But, it hasn't helped my work, beyond getting a really good eye.  I know the key is to apply them, but I'm not sure how.  If you have any tips for that, that'd be awesome.

With the arm studies, it was easy--  Just do 88 refs and 88 application/imagination.  Drill it over and over.  But, I can't do that with perspective paintings--  Or values-- I'm not sure how to apply that.

Do you think you could give me specific pointers about that?  It would help me so, so soooo much.  If anyone has pointers for that, or any ideas about how to get me in the right direction and focusing on the right things, that'd be great.

I feel like I'm flailing around in the dark.

Doing these master studies doesn't get me anywhere-- I need to go to the next step, but I'm not sure where that is.

I don't know.

I'm really lost.

Anyways.. For now, I'll just try doing basic shapes, and thumbnails, and work hard at nailing down perspective.. As you said. And, thanks again-- You rock smrr!

Sketchblag

 Join our Study Group: The Velvet Revolvers!  Let's work hard together!
Reply
hey Bookend,

I know exactly how you feel, I maybe get a day where I think I'm making progress, then everything just goes bad on me and I end up demotivated and not sure if I'm working on the right things.

Just keep at it man and try to find a plan that works for you, I'm trying to focus on one thing at a time, but I'm not sure that's working for my wandering mind, or even if it's the best approach, so maybe switching about will work better for you as well.

hotel room is looking good though, really, I think you can push this one.

OK so you asked for tips on perspective, I hope you won't be offended but I tried to do a paintover to show what I mean, it's kinda crude but hopefully it'll make sense alongside what I'm writing.

there are a couple of things that to me, look like they're killing the illusion of depth a bit, the room looks to be one point perspective, unless I've misread it, so for the most part all the parallel lines moving away from you should hit that single vanishing point eventually.

the tv on the wall, between the door and wardrobe, the horizontal lines on that don't both go the the vanishing point, so it throws the shape out a bit.

The bed, it looks like the headboard end is against the wall, which follows to the vanishing point, but if you take the lines of the bed and follow them along, the other end of the bed seems to go to a different vanishing point.

Also, the sofa, the cushion part that you sit on, the horizontal lines on that (the ones that are parallel with the bed and not going to the vanishing point) should be horizontal, like across the picture, if that makes sense.

My only other tip, which I constantly mess up on, is to consider the size of things against other things, so door against window, wardrobe, etc. That part is so bloody hard! I draw stuff all the time with floor to ceiling sinks or chairs bigger than a door.

I hope that makes sense and doesn't sound like I'm being harsh and just tearing you apart, but tightening that stuff up will make the whole thing read so much better.

One of the things that I do now and then, especially when i'm stuck or if I see ref that I just can't work out, is to draw the lines along and try to work out the vanishing points, it's useful because you can see how to acheive certain views yourself.

Anyways, I'll shut up now! hope that helps a t least a little.


Attached Files Image(s)




Reply
hey Book end!

If it's rendering that is frustrating then do focused exercises on that. Pick something that is simple at first so you can really focus on the rendering. You can pick a fruit, or some folded paper and do a painting, really focusing on the rendering.
The folded paper is nice to start with cause that way you can practice lighting planes, if you get colored papers you can also practice the bouncing colors from one plane to other. Plus they're easy to set up in your desk :P
You don't have to stop your other studies if you dont want to , these are more like complementary paintings where all you care about is the rendering.

Don't be discouraged, keep going!
once you've noticed a weakness it always takes a while to improve on it , even though you're aware of it, you have to really push yourself to fix it. it usually takes several painting attempts, at least this has been my experience.

Reply
(10-12-2015, 08:57 AM)Bookend Wrote: [quote pid='90658' dateline='1444600441']

I need you to know that I've done master studies...  I've done them very well.  I've nailed down shapes, values, and perspective within them perfectly.  Here's some examples: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-5...l#pid75844

But, it hasn't helped my work, beyond getting a really good eye.  I know the key is to apply them, but I'm not sure how.  If you have any tips for that, that'd be awesome.

With the arm studies, it was easy--  Just do 88 refs and 88 application/imagination.  Drill it over and over.  But, I can't do that with perspective paintings--  Or values-- I'm not sure how to apply that.

Do you think you could give me specific pointers about that?  It would help me so, so soooo much.  If anyone has pointers for that, or any ideas about how to get me in the right direction and focusing on the right things, that'd be great.

I feel like I'm flailing around in the dark.

Doing these master studies doesn't get me anywhere-- I need to go to the next step, but I'm not sure where that is.

[/quote]
Sorry to double post, but I just read your latest reply x_X

What has helped me personally, more than master studies ,  is doing life drawing,  translating a 3dimensional shape by myself into a 2d plane and tryng to make it look 3d.
I really don't know why, it could be that when you do that you're problem solving by yourself instead of copying the result in a master study..? I really dont know why it works, but it works for me.

From what I see in your sketchbook, you do a lot of photo studies and master copies, which is ok they have a place if they're helping you, but maybe give life drawing a try as well. Try doing at least a  painting from life a day. But start with something simple so you dont get too overwhelmed. Focus on the rendering and  structure.

Just my 2 cents ^^

Reply
Hello Bookend,

you're killing those thumbnail enviros man!

Try to look for your personal bias in images? The kind of pictures that you want to make to give yourself satisfaction?  There's alot of art thats interesting in their own right, but the kind that satisfies your urges the most.

If you're still drawing blanks, keep looking at pictures and analyzing your ideas about them, and keep making compositions that serve the narrative and push them to express the narrative as strongly as you can.

Good start on the sketch, I did a paintover based on how I think the lighting can read better. I could be misunderstanding the scene though, is there a ceiling light turned on in the lit part of the room?




Keep on truckin'!
Reply
Hey Bookend! Something that has helped me a lot is switching up the medium a lot, I now do life drawings every day traditionally, switching between ink and graphite. Makes you think in totally different ways, and I realised that I personally have the same habits when painting digitally. I always approach things the same way, which I guess can be fine but for my learning process it's not doing it for me. It's as if I'm numb when doing digital studies. Could be totally different from you, and it only comes down to a personal matter.

In terms of values I always check for the absolute darkest dark pretty early, so I have something to compare everything else to. There's nothing more frightening that working on a white canvas with no information about values what so ever.

I guess breaking down more advanced forms such as the arm, leg (anything really) to simple tubes or cylinders if you will is a good idea. Charles Bargue's figure drawings are an excellent excersize for both training the eyes, and forcing you to deconstruct the human body.

It may feel clueless sometimes but seriously, you have the right mentality so progress is inevitable. Keep crunching Book! : D
Reply
I'll make sure to do more personalized replies tomorrow guys, but I am sooo overwhelmed and touched by the outpouring of support and tips and help.  I honestly couldn't ask for better!  You are all super amazing people.  You should be proud! And I hope that you guys keep being awesome with your work too-- Wowww.

I love the paintovers and the perspective fixes-- They really helped me (And my sis) out!

So, we decided to switch jobs a bit.  We realized that we were both tackling our weak spots, me with environments, her with characters.

I'm a lot more stoked for our project now that I'm gonna get to do characters, since I've mostly studied people and faces over everything else all these years, haha..  And considering it's pixellated gameplay, it means I can keep things simpler, and it can still look good!

So, here's a sprite I'm working on.  He's the hotel clerk from Gabriel Knight 3.  Being revamped in all his 2d pixellated glory. (Instead of the shotty, awkward 3d it was at the time.)

Also, an example of Gabriel Knight 1 (Copyrights and all that go to Sierra and Jane Jensen and all those folks who made it)..  This is an Example of the type of visuals we want to create for our version of Gabriel Knight 3.


Attached Files Image(s)




Sketchblag

 Join our Study Group: The Velvet Revolvers!  Let's work hard together!
Reply
Hey guiz!  Thanks again! 

Lurch:  Thanks so much!  Yeah, I hate it when I get demotivated, but luckily, with your help, and everyone else, I am totally psyched.  And I'm also not doing the rooms/environments for this project anymore, so there is a huge weight taken off my shoulders. I'd much rather practice at the mentorship before I put it into an actual project..  Really pleased about doing characters.

Voodoo Ma:  Thanks so much, you clever lady!  These are great ideas.  I'm totally going to try doing a full rendering of something from life, and generally take stuff from life more often-- Photos are, by their very nature, flat.  Life drawing is just.. Better.  And I've always enjoyed it more than doing it from photos.  Thanks a bunch!

dodeqaa:  Wow, superb paintover.  I sent this to my sister, and she's been working off of it, since it really worked.  I'm doing characters now, so I'm not so worried anymore.  She's doing way better than I would at this stage, haha.  Thanks man.

Murd: Thanks dude.  It's a great idea to switch up the mediums-- They are hugely beneficial to changing one's perspective.  Also, something I haven't done in awhile is draw with my left hand instead of my right.  Helps a lot with accuracy and sight.  Unfortunately, my left wrist has been giving me sharp pains, as it does occasionally.. So will have to rest it.


---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Making a lot more progress today--  More motivated, feeling more positive.  Whew.  Glad that dark time is behind me for now-- Thanks to all you lovely folks!

So, I'm finished the first sprite, and he's looking amazing.  Putting him next to Gabriel's sprite from the first one, so you can compare.

Also started working on Amit's 3rd assignment-- I've made a lot of progress, but this is DEFINITELY a WORK IN PROGRESS.  I still have a lot of work to do on it, and I'm going to spend more time than the last two weeks making it look right for the lighting.


Attached Files Image(s)




Sketchblag

 Join our Study Group: The Velvet Revolvers!  Let's work hard together!
Reply
So proud of ya man, happy you're back in the game <3
This wip looks great, keep pushing, you've so got this!

Reply
Hey man,

great job on those comp - studies. It is great practice to do those thumbnail sketches. My advice would be to do them in pencil or pen, since photoshop tends to make me do stuff bigger than it needs to be. Also squint, squint, squint. Simplify those pictures and try to see the big shapes. Squinting really helped me to find the focal point in a painting and understand, why it was the focal point.

Keep it uuuurp


Please help me getting better by checking out my sketchbook

HOMEPAGE http://floart.weebly.com
Reply
smrr: Thanks, you lovely person!  You were a huge help in that direction, haha. Grin

Flo:  Thanks dude.  I'll try pencil/pen.  I like all mediums, haha.  Grin  I'm glad people keep telling me to squint--  It's something I forget.  Thanks again!

--------------------------

Moar sprite.


Attached Files Image(s)



Sketchblag

 Join our Study Group: The Velvet Revolvers!  Let's work hard together!
Reply
Walk cycle!

It's really simple, but that's on purpose.  The important thing though, is the position of arms and legs.  Hopefully I can get that cleared up.  Then once I've got the general idea, shrinkin' it down to pixellizeness, and maybe cleaning it up a bit.  I think my sis might be doing the shrinking it down and cleaning it up thing.  I dunno.


Attached Files Image(s)



Sketchblag

 Join our Study Group: The Velvet Revolvers!  Let's work hard together!
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 7 Guest(s)