Kassatay's sketchbook
#21
those last studies are really good, you're grasping the form quite well ! wanna see more stuff and painting from imagination ! keep it up !

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#22
Excellent advice from 'Who'! Drawing from imagination and learning to finish things will really help you so much in the long run. I too had the mind set of 'I'll only draw from imagination when I feel my skills are ready', but the ready never comes. It's always a sliding scale, if you let it be. It's hard, but know by doing it you are heading in the right direction and will help create a bridge over where you are and where you want to be. I sense potential in you! I will be watching your journey with much excitement and curiosity. :D
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#23
The last batch of studies is looking good! Looks like your building up good mileage!

As for drawing from imagination. Personally, I will sometimes do drawings or paintings 100% without reference just to see where I need to improve or where I need to study more. It's a bit of a double-edged sword because you can get stuck in doing things "wrong" because you have no reference to compare to...

On the other hand, it teaches you to sketch and mock stuff up quickly and pull things from your visual library. I'm not 100% sure to this day where I stand with this method. More research is required for sure ...

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#24
Those studies are giving me flashbacks... Spitting image of what I had to do in joint BAGame Design and BAFine Art classes. We'd watch Scott Robertson. We'd draw boxes. We'd draw gestural lines. We'd do life drawing and when the model moved the tutor would point out what was 'wrong' with how we saw the body. We'd stand around while the tutor asked us asinine questions about what an axis was. It was suffocating.

I only remark on this because you mentioned you're not confident in drawing from the imagination. I found certain curriculum stifling, and boxed-in the thought processes behind an artwork instead of only acting as a guide to bring an artwork into focus. People put too much value on it.

It's good to have the skills to reflect on your work and note areas of improvement, but definitely, I recommend starting to pull from your imagination and challenge your creativity before the fundamentals wear you down.

"Your art has same face syndrome"

"Yeah, and yours has same tits syndrome, you don't see anyone complaining..."
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Sketcherinos
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#25
(03-14-2021, 11:05 AM)RottenPocket Wrote: Those studies are giving me flashbacks... Spitting image of what I had to do in joint BAGame Design and BAFine Art classes. We'd watch Scott Robertson. We'd draw boxes. We'd draw gestural lines. We'd do life drawing and when the model moved the tutor would point out what was 'wrong' with how we saw the body. We'd stand around while the tutor asked us asinine questions about what an axis was. It was suffocating.

I only remark on this because you mentioned you're not confident in drawing from the imagination. I found certain curriculum stifling, and boxed-in the thought processes behind an artwork instead of only acting as a guide to bring an artwork into focus. People put too much value on it.

It's good to have the skills to reflect on your work and note areas of improvement, but definitely, I recommend starting to pull from your imagination and challenge your creativity before the fundamentals wear you down.
I might be mistaken here but the language used when you describe your joint BA makes me think you might have studied in the UK (I think Americans have different terminology ? )If you did would you mind saying what uni it was ?

It's just I was under the impression that art degrees in the UK barely focus on fundamentals at all but if there is a degree that focuses on them, I might be tempted to go back to uni to study that.  Or maybe Feng Zhu school of design.

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