Beau's Sketchbook
#21
[Image: bodystody.PNG]Daily 1

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#22
Not done yet, but I'm debating making the cape longer for compositional reasons. Thoughts?[Image: nowilmer_barbarianfinal.png][Image: wilmer_barbarianfincapeal.png]
Too long looks knightly though, so I wouldn't consider longer than this.
Thinking

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#23
(02-18-2019, 02:46 PM)darktiste Wrote: Atleast work with quality image.Other than that would be good to add what your studying so we can help you push toward that goal or else might recieve critism that are less relevant to what you currently trying to improve it doesn't reduce the value of that critic but your less likely to be able to inject it into your work right away.Let say some give you a critic on perspective but your studying value... it still pertinent on the long term but as little to do with your current study.

Right. Yeah, in that image and most other ones I've posted, I'm studying shape relationships, esp between multiple figures. Not lighting in that one, but a lot of others (like the apples, the orange), and drawing. Painting is something I;m comfortable with relative to my other skills, so I'm drawing a lot more right now and really trying to get shape and form mostly.

But I will start posting the study goal with my image. Thank you for that suggestion. that's super helpful! :)

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#24
[Image: redline.PNG]Not the best painting ever, I could tear it apart myself, but this is what I mean when I say I'm lacking in the drawing department- I overcompensate with rendering because I can't get a good base. I haven't improved much, either, because only two weeks ago did I start studying again, for the first time in... 2 years, I think, so this is current, even though it's from last November.

Lol. I did the Brad Rigney approach and spent upwards of 40 f****** hours rendering with a pixel brush and the smudge tool. Learned a ton, but f*** all that noise. Never again

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#25
pixel brush... huh, i remember doin that lol

70+Page Koala Sketchbook: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-3465.html SB

Paintover thread, submit for crits! http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-7879.html
[color=rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.882)]e owl sat on an oak. The more he saw, the less he spoke.[/color]
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#26
[Image: bubble.png]Second daily for yesterday- I was super inspired and going to work more, and then I went and washed dishes and listened to convention panels about voice acting.

for three hours.

Yeah. I'm real dumb. Lol Stupid

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#27


the lines reminds me of this lol

70+Page Koala Sketchbook: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-3465.html SB

Paintover thread, submit for crits! http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-7879.html
[color=rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.882)]e owl sat on an oak. The more he saw, the less he spoke.[/color]
Reply
#28
[Image: compo.PNG]
Just wanted to share this super neat shape I found in the composition. Happy accidents!

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#29
(02-19-2019, 03:16 AM)Fedodika Wrote:

the lines reminds me of this lol
Jesus, are my lines THAT unfunny? XD

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#30
Shape language you know about that?Do you know what a triangle mean?I think you did achieve the intended meaning.Sometime
if a pose or the silhouette of your character can be working against your goal.Let say you want to design a little boy who is really loveable what shape would you use?If you said something else than circle you might want to learn more about shape language into inject into your work.For now i will assume you understand shape language.


Attached Files Image(s)



My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply
#31
How do I get so unbelievably tired? I mistyped that so much even

In the chains, I'm just trying to familiarize myself with the patterns and flows of it.

In the satchels, finding out how satchels look. Lame studies today. I know they don't look great, they're practice for the barbarian pieace, which will be done tomorrow. Can't wait to share it.

[Image: Illustration27.png]


Getting into full throttle art mode again starting tomorrow- I'm not going to be human for a while, lol

[Image: i7tyfi7di.png]

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#32
My motto is never work on an empty brain the gain are just not there.But this is just hard to understand and apply because you never know when you can still push.I just believe that sloppy study are waste of time if you don't internalize the study you need to have enough brain function to actually be able to transfer the knowledge to your memeory. The best indication that your not learning is that you are simply copying without thinking about the fundamental.Sloppy doesn't alway mean bad aslong as your commiting the information to memeory.

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply
#33
Close to the end!

Just need to add chains to the waist, ink the waist, handle, and boots, fix the shadow, and add some compositional background shapes, and then I'll do a color correction and that'll be it.
[Image: wilmer_barbarianfinal3.png]

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#34
[Image: applestudy.png][Image: shoestudy.png]

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#35
Hey Beau, good stuff here!

I really like your barbarian girl concept, sensing the Akira Toriyama vibe haha.
The painting shines, the colour palette connects very well and the low saturation aesthetic is a very clever solution.

Some portions of the drawing are really captivating; right arm and hand, the sword, the collar fur, the cape, the hair and the way you detail the fur. Those are very rich spots for your drawing´s favour.

Now, what i see that breaks that harmony is the face, which is one of the most highlighted parts of every illustration/ concept that has characters in it. 
The features are drawed well but the problem is that they do not connect; the eyes seem not alligned, neither the mouth,  nose and chin. I cannot touch exactly on what it is, the proportion, the alligment, i just feel that something is not entirely closing.
The maneirisms and porportions of the girl are a bit masculine, not sure if it was the goal.

Hope that you don´t mind that i made a luce drawover to illustrate some of the points.


Designwise, a few things can increase the readability;
1. the sword base could be bigger for readability sake
2. something like an accessory for the sword to give her some personality
3. Give more shape and personality for the fur.
4. Give more form to the lef, even though covered with large pants and fur boots.




Just my two cents man but anyway, fantastic work!

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#36
(02-21-2019, 06:39 AM)RickRichards Wrote: Hey Beau, good stuff here!

I really like your barbarian girl concept, sensing the Akira Toriyama vibe haha.
The painting shines, the colour palette connects very well and the low saturation aesthetic is a very clever solution.

Some portions of the drawing are really captivating; right arm and hand, the sword, the collar fur, the cape, the hair and the way you detail the fur. Those are very rich spots for your drawing´s favour.

Now, what i see that breaks that harmony is the face, which is one of the most highlighted parts of every illustration/ concept that has characters in it. 
The features are drawed well but the problem is that they do not connect; the eyes seem not alligned, neither the mouth,  nose and chin. I cannot touch exactly on what it is, the proportion, the alligment, i just feel that something is not entirely closing.
The maneirisms and porportions of the girl are a bit masculine, not sure if it was the goal.

Hope that you don´t mind that i made a luce drawover to illustrate some of the points.


Designwise, a few things can increase the readability;
1. the sword base could be bigger for readability sake
2. something like an accessory for the sword to give her some personality
3. Give more shape and personality for the fur.
4. Give more form to the lef, even though covered with large pants and fur boots.



Just my two cents man but anyway, fantastic work!

Thanks for the critique. Yes, I really wanted to have her feel like a dragon quest character. It's a d&d character, a human barbarian girl, and she's tough and kind of a loner. I wanted to give her the feeling that she goes around picking up different things from places, so her gear is haphazard, if that makes sense? Her wide stance is to show toughness and physical fortitude. So yes on the masculinity, but the face gave me a lot of trouble. I'm not good with head anatomy, from the skull to the mouth to the chin, and I need to study it more, probably going to tonight. Yeah she was supposed to be tilting her head slightly toward the camera, and I guess I got confused by that angle. I couldn't seem to find the right placement for the features, so after a while I said screw it and did whatever. Should I redraw it? I probably will in any case, it doesn't feel great.

What did you mean by the legs not being connected? I've always had a problem with legs, and then with grounding the feet. Her foot pointing at us Feels weird, but it's like I can't tell where it needs to fit in the pose. Keeping in mind this is a free commission, which I agree, f*cking stupid of me to have offered (lol oops) I don't want to spend too much more time on fixing areas I've moved on from.

My thing with doing it for free is he's a friend, he has D&D friends that need commissions doe, so it's like a trade for marketing. But I didn't realize how dumb that was to not take anything, until about 16 hours into the piece lol.

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#37
Quick update, I fixed the main issues in the face. her head now feels to me like it's tilting.




[Image: Capture.dfgrPNG.PNG]

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#38
[Image: guy.png][Image: pairoffruit.png]Studies- I love the pear

Sketchbook (updated daily) https://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-8600.html

discord: Beau#4149


1. Use the biggest brush possible for a given passage.
2. Paint large shapes first, followed by small shapes.
3. Save your tonal and chromatic accents until the last.
4. Try to soften any edge that doesn’t need to be sharp.
5. Take time to get the center of interest right.

Or, the briefer version: (B.L.A.S.T.)
Big brushes.
Large to small.
Accents last.
Soften edges.
Take your time. 

(James Gurney)
Reply
#39
Yo man!
Hope you don´t mind i´ve revisited your drawing just to illustrate what i´ve meant by connection between the legs and the torso. Two considerations;

LEGS-TORSO CONNECTION
1- When drawing clothing think always about the underlying form below, the body needs to exist coherently below the clothes.
2- Clothes should wrap and enhance the form, or at least hint to form, even with baggy pants haha
3- Overlap. The biggest trick in the book to sell form ( i´ve made a quick example in the drawover)
I´m still struggling with that one. Jason Seiler as well as Nathan Fowkes always pushed that tip in their courses.

HEAD STRUCTURE
1- Suggestion; tackle three kinds of heads to learn quicker the struckture of the head and enhance heads, which should be a priority on any illustrator carreer;

A) Studying heads from photos, some quick doodles, one or two with more time dedicated to it

B) Studying construtive anatomy refs such as Andrew Loomis - make a couple of quick studies, structure sketches and one or two finished.


C) Study the artist you admire, for example, if you admire the artistry of Akira Toriyama for Dragon Quest, by all means draw a few head sketches from Akira Toriyama, either from DB manga, Dr. Slum or Dragon Quest etc. ( Dragon Quest VIII for ps2 has the best concept art- that´s a persona taste haha)

2) Explore a bit, as i´ve did in the drawover, two solutions, one with a wider cap for the nose like Trunks in DB or Jim Hawkins in Treasure Planet, and other with a more concentrated features. I guarantee you, if you start nailing heads you will have tons of fun.

Hope it hellps my friend. Just my couple of cents haha.



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#40
Hello and welcome!

I feel like you are doing a disservice to yourself with the way you sloppily approach your line based studies.
Line quality is important and requires just as much attention as any other fundamental esp. since it is one of those base level skills even if it is for 'visual library' study.

I suggest you not do such sloppy lines in the future when doing initial layins or line study. Focus on nailing accuracy of angle and length relationships and your line quality in a way that aids showing the form. Don't chicken scratch multiple times over one section. If you need to you can do a light guide line first that you can estimate and measure/correct off and then try hit it once with a final darker line over the guide. Or draw...undo then draw again until it looks right. Don't scribble or use move/translate/warp tools in digi as a crutch or better yet do these traditionally...in pen or pencil.

Google Dorien Iten accuracy guide, it's a good simple free (pay what you want) resource on comparative measurement and accuracy)
Focus and be more present with your drawing studies and know specifically what and why you are doing the study. If you slow down and take more care you will also understand and retain what you are studying better and not continue on bad habits.

The still lives look ok, but you seem to be missing a lot in the lower value range. Are these photo studies or are you doing them from life and taking the photos? If from only the photo..again you seem to be rushing through and not getting the most out of these that you perhaps might by trying to be more accurate. Same goes for the digi paint studies. You don't seem to have any real focus in mind while doing them (is it value grouping, colour study, form, vis library, composition?) They all seem rushed through and fairly sloppy and abandoned before really nailing any aspect that could be studied.

Good luck!

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