Fedodika the Koala
CGmythology: Many thanks my friend I appreciate the kind words!

Marco: Thank Marco

darktiste: Oh wise and infinitely knowledgeable darktiste thank you for blessing me with your very relevant observation. if you ever feel like giving me another insightful paint over please don't be shy

so for the past few days i've been working on charcoal daddy and I am now doing an oil painting which I cannot get a good photograph of today but I will attempt to tomorrow when there is more Daylight


ref
https://arthive.com/res/media/img/[email protected]


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70+Page Koala Sketchbook: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-3465.html SB

Paintover thread, submit for crits! http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-7879.html
[color=rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.882)]e owl sat on an oak. The more he saw, the less he spoke.[/color]
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Okay for the past few days I have been failing at this oil painting; I figured I'd give some insight on the things I fucked up on so any of you who ever try oil painting almost blind we'll have some idea what to do.

Firstly you need to plan out where are your lighter values are because once you have your colors in place it becomes increasingly difficult to layer white on top of those colors without white dragging the color down and just making an off-white color

Secondly you need to understand that a lot of pigments have different transparency which can make it difficult to layer them late in the process. Lemon yellow on top of the colors late in the game and if you put it in a mix it will just kind of disintegrate

Thirdly try to blend your colors on your palette before you put them on the canvas.When you do apply a harsh white highlight you will need the brush to be exceptionally clean. You want your brushstrokes to look scratchy and small. Some good planning in the early phases.

fourthly, you can move things around a little bit early on and get away with it but don't plan on doing it too much. My heavy-handed approach will eventually be charming but right now it looks ugly as shit


These are simply some notes from ya boi diving down the mountain of Art i'm hitting every Rock on the way down, getting every red light, but still trying his best to make it on time

I'm going to try again tomorrow and start fresh since I screwed up this canvas. Another stinker to add 2 fedos pile o shame

And God forbid I get a good photograph of this always some kind of stupid glare or specular even in in the shadows


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70+Page Koala Sketchbook: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-3465.html SB

Paintover thread, submit for crits! http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-7879.html
[color=rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.882)]e owl sat on an oak. The more he saw, the less he spoke.[/color]
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(12-01-2019, 12:45 PM)Fedodika Wrote: you need to plan out where are your lighter values are because once you have your colors in place it becomes increasingly difficult to layer white on top of those colors without white dragging the color down and just making an off-white color

Ugh this is so true. Devastated, very sad


You could retouch it when it's dry, though, or scrape it off where you want the brighter color to be! Good luck on your next go at it.

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C0W: I confirmed a lot of the ideas I had simply trying them out! Using a bigger brush that was also quite soft proved to be the better choice for blending the tones and small hard brushes something I honestly should have known.

Here's another figure study and of course I don't see how off it is until I take a photo of it; head is too small the arm is wrong in a way that it is too thin. Ends up making the whole leg look too big, maybe after a year or so I'll have much less of these issues. I'll probably even redraw most of these the second time because they're just so fun to draw.

Laugh it up, you don't live like I do at the mercy of any sista with wrist scars and black eye goo


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70+Page Koala Sketchbook: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-3465.html SB

Paintover thread, submit for crits! http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-7879.html
[color=rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.882)]e owl sat on an oak. The more he saw, the less he spoke.[/color]
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Generally speaking, the more medium is in your paint, the harder the paint is to control. Modern paint manufacturers include am excess of oil in their tubes so it comes pre-loaded with medium, making it already fluid enough for most thinly painted styles and can be a difficulty for direct painting. You can of course work around this but you either need to have a process suited for it or you need to get good at paint handling with soft paints. I recommend just removing as much oil as you can from the paint so you can first learn to work with paint in a state where it's easier to control, excluding mediums or solvents from the process.

When first learning how to paint in oils, an option to consider is to just finish most of the painting without white, then adding white at the end. You do this by painting in scumbles and just build up the whole impression, wiping off paint to get the light back. Then once you're done, you really only need to address a few small areas if you want the light to feel more solid. It's a very simple way to transition from drawing into painting because it doesn't rely on much paint-handling in order to get good results and it slowly introduces how to handle paint.
http://www.art-catalog.ru/data_picture_2.../11612.jpg
https://www.russianphotographs.net/artic...van_08.jpg

Another option is to work similarly but matching the colors and values on the palette and placing them thinly in their right spot. If you use stiffer paint with no medium, this will be very easy to control and there won't be any slipping and sliding going on outside of your control.
https://i1.wp.com/emilcarlsen.org/wp-con...091%2C4587

If you find yourself going thicker constantly, try switching over to a shorter bristle brush and pressing into the painting with every mark. It will cut through the surface and instead of just slathering on paint on top of paint, you can replace the paint on the surface. The bristle brush will deposit some of the paint in the brush and it will also pick up paint from the surface, replacing it rather than constantly adding more. Oil painting isn't suited for a free for all approach where you throw around paint and hope for the best. Every mark you make will effect future marks so it's best to work thinly with less fluid paint to minimise this effect until you have the basics under control.

Generally you want to avoid layering wet pigments as much as possible. Pigments have different drying rates and something like a lead white over ivory black will cause the surface to dry and isolate the lower pigments, causing them to dry much more slowly, causing an internal tension in the pain layer, making it more susceptible to cracking as it ages. It's one reason bristle brushes are so good, they penetrate the surface of the wet paint causing a more homogenous paint layer.

In this last painting, if you find your modelling of the light feels slippery, it's usually because of the paint consistency. You'll find consistently that older oil paintings always preserve a very stiff white for the lights, even if the overall painting is very thin. It helps in modelling the subtle light half-tones as well as helping the effect of showing solid lights and transparent shadows.
https://arthive.com/res/media/img/oy1200...478342.jpg

Discord - JetJaguar#8954
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Mr. Berndt: Thank you alot for this suggestion! i got a lot of mileage out of it in the past couple of days whilst painting some loomis heads. Im starting to get the feel for how one would work with layering, and just how important it is to have confidence in the strokes one is putting down (and accuracy.) My plan is to do a couple small leyendecker studies on these small canvases in the coming days to practice tiling and try to do less blending and scrubbing and try to just mix the right colors on the pallete since i dont want to be scrubbing off paint when  i much prefer the look of thicker strokes. Its just something i gotta adapt to, though the examples you provided are marvelous. also, if you get the time, your advice youve given to a lot of artists here could benefit a wide audience, maybe consider putting your work into some sort of permenant archive, as it could be a masterclass in itself, even if the person cant see whose work youre critiquing.


Heres more bails and fails from old fedo, the 2 (skewed and bad female) portraits are loomis copies. The paint is very thin on them and i was getting the feel for how to lay tones down and scrub them off to get a white value; this proved to be just what i was missing on; control over the white value mainly. The portrait with the scrubbed out mouth is a leyendecker study, i kept screwing up the mouth so i just wiped it off, disappointed in myself i went back home to go to bed. However, my parents reacted more positively to this painting that any traditional work i'd ever done. They thought it was brilliant for some reason, the fact it has no mouth. So that was a pleasant surprise, they actually encouraged me not to add the mouth, so i guess I wont!

The figure study has a few issues with it, mainly the tilt is kinda stiff in the torso, the  leg shapes and proportions are a tad short or too long here and there. a couple other things... i'll probably end up doing these again next year theyve been so fun. the other drawings are crap from life drawing, looks way better before i take a photo of it, as usual. All the problems just immediately appear once i take a photo, or even hold my camera up to it. It's like it makes me think of the image as an actual JPEG which is funnily enough the way ive viewed most images in my adult life. That's basically the mirror trick for me is just the photo lens; if only i had a robot eye that made everything a jpeg as i drew it, that'd be helpful, i guess thats a nother crutch of digital is it trained me to see everything with that instant mirror flip to check that over and over. 

In other news, I'll be getting a brand new computer soon, its custom made, i had a technician help me pick things out. also shoutout to Toxicpanda for showing her specs and giving me some ideas. It has a 32GB RAM a I9 processor, 16 TB Hard drive, and a bunch of other stuff, but altogether its about a 2k$ computer and its a freakin beast. Also got a nice Dell 32" Monitor on the black friday sale and grabbed marmoset toolbag on discount too. So when i get all this stuff, im going hard on some 3d. I really want to get familiar with 3d coat as i think this is what will make me employable. It'll force me to make my assets and characters look good, plus ill have all the cheats of digital and many more. being able to light and place these objects accurately will be invaluable to me, since i can paint things together, it may just be what i need to break through in a meaningful way. 

I'll still be doing lots of oil painting since theres a show i want to have that chloe painting done for in january, and may have a commission from a friend soon, which will help. Next year will be interesting with these new tools and ideas, so i hope i can at least make some money to pay off this investment. And if ya cant tell, i got a new keyboard, its mechanical, and really loud, I LOVE IT! clackety clkaclkekltlkclkalkelktlkalkcalkclakslkalskeylmkarsynl


Attached Files Image(s)









70+Page Koala Sketchbook: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-3465.html SB

Paintover thread, submit for crits! http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-7879.html
[color=rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.882)]e owl sat on an oak. The more he saw, the less he spoke.[/color]
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Some really nice looking updates here. Glad to hear you're going to be studying 3D soon and getting a new computer, should be a lot of fun for you to tackle a new medium! I really enjoy the Loomis head paintings, those skin tones are brilliant, very rich in colors! Nice work with the pencils too, always a fan of your shading and use of light for your figure studies :)

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CG: many thanks for the kind words my dude

more tiling practice, i quite enjoyed these little heads; focusing on mixing on the palette and not relying on blending on the canvas, just putting down the right mark first


Attached Files Image(s)




70+Page Koala Sketchbook: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-3465.html SB

Paintover thread, submit for crits! http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-7879.html
[color=rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.882)]e owl sat on an oak. The more he saw, the less he spoke.[/color]
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