Help me become a Professional Artist
#61
Looks good so far ^^
I would like to make a suggestion or two. I see that you're doing a bunch of figure drawings and that's awesome. I would however like to see some anatomy studies. Knowing the bone and muscle structure of the figure becomes extremely valuable when drawing the figure.

I'd also advice you to focus more on drawing and outline for now. A lot of people jump head first into paintings with values and colors but learning how to draw accurately makes everything a lot easier down the road. Drawing may not be as "sexy" as painting but it is more important to learn ^^

Anyway, keep on working!

Discord - JetJaguar#8954
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#62
Hey thanks for stoping by!

A lot of figure studies, construction, head. I'm also looking at Michael Hampton's book and at Proko's website recently, really useful content, right? :D

You asked about the compotisional studies, I answered there in my sketchbook but I think you are going to read it first here: I try to think about the focal points, balance between values, contrast, where to place things, how to lead the viewer's eyes this kind of stuff.

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#63
i really need to upload my traditional sketches , i need to get some juicy crits from those , maybe tonight.
in the meantime heres digital mumbo jumbos 
[Image: Still%20life.jpg]
[Image: Measuring%20practice%201.jpg]
[Image: JON%20SNU.jpg]
[Image: ges.jpg][Image: figure%20drawing%201.jpg][Image: pecks%20study.jpg][Image: shadow%20mapping%20of%20noobness.jpg][Image: you%20suck%20at%20selfies%202.jpg]

UPDATE from the schedule i have , had to admit it got chaotic on Week 3 (?)  and decided to get overtime in Mainly drawing, so less time was put upon PERSPECTIVE. im gonna re assert myself though and commit to the schedule i have organized. im doing what amit said , taking notes of what to do tomorrow before going to sleep just cause the schedule that i come up with is till quite as specific.

Right now im working on Bargue drawings , and academic drawing approach , as Tristan suggested.
i know how im weak at measuring from life , so im hoping this bargue drawings would help me be more accurate.
One of these days im gonna start and make up a portfolio ... one of these days.

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#64
[Image: Barca%20studies.jpg]
[Image: Ehads.jpg][Image: ffsdf.jpg][Image: HAMPTON%202%20assignment.jpg][Image: hands.jpg][Image: Hannibal.jpg][Image: sdf.jpg][Image: still%20life%203.jpg][Image: still%20luf.jpg][Image: Untitled-1.jpg][Image: Villpu%20study%201.jpg][Image: Webcomic%201.jpg]


another week another scattered way of learning. i just have no direction right now in terms of making my own stuff. im so busy trying to master copying copying copying. not really making my own stuff. i tried it with my hannibal stuff , but i did not know why i have stopped. graahhhh i got so much time but no way of organizing things to have an effective learning , maybe im just so burnt out. how do you go about this guys?

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#65
Hi KurtJarmey, I find that Im the most effective with my time when there is a clear goal. For example I want to draw and or paint X better. then I do a schedual or a list of exercises to achive it. It works if you can stick with your routine and do the right exercises for the certain goal.
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#66
@KurtJeremy: Its good that you are diciplined to do the grinding for the milage and all. The progress will come with that. But also remember to be creative and do things that are fun to you. That might fuel your inquire into fundamentals of gesture and character that are relevant to what you would like to improve in your own work. Does that make sense? Eitherway you are doing great, I especially like you villpu study it looks neet. :)
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#67
Great to see so much variety in your sketchbook-- You're going in the right direction, for sure. Keep it up and you'll be on top. Grin

Sketchblag

 Join our Study Group: The Velvet Revolvers!  Let's work hard together!
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#68
hey kurt; saw your comment in the shoutbox and though i'd drop a line.

i think sometimes artists become jaded regarding their abilities and creations. for example suppose you were proficient in a musical instrument 150 years ago. you'd probably be asked to play at family gatherings and whatnot; your music would be a product of your life, location and influences and would be appreciated as such. today if you whip out an instrument(say a guitar) more often than not people will ask you to play a song by some band they like.

with the globalization of information provided by the internet(music and art being included types of information) it can be easy to devalue one's own creations given the saturation of art available to anyone with an internet connection but it doesn't diminish the value or profundity the skill set you're building. I'm reasonably proficient in the guitar but I'm not the best in the world. That doesn't matter
though. I can pick up a conglomeration of wood with some strings attached to it and create pleasing frequency ratios as I more or less imagine them. That's pretty fucking cool ability to have. Before I started drawing it was my ambition to be the "best guitarist in the world"(a nebulous and un-quantifiable goal in retrospect). On a few occasions I played until my fingers were
literally sliced open by the strings. But music is a reflection of one's life. If a person's entire life consists of nothing but playing [inset x instrument](or even doing [insert x activity]) the results, while technically impressive, are boring.

The relevance was in being able to play the music I heard in my head. The instrument was just that; an instrument, a tool for externalizing the internal. As an aside, the same ratios that are found pleasant in music are found pleasant in composition(google "armature of the rectangle" and "root rectangles" for more on this).

When learning the craft of drawing I think it's important to keep in mind that it is just that; a craft. It's a language: a means of expression to help convey ideas. And while there are tools to help you be more eloquent in conveying these ideas(perspective, anatomy, all the basic fundamentals) the significance is not in the articulation itself but in the content of these ideas(at least this is my
opinion).


“It beats all the things that wealth can give and everything else in the world to say the things one believes, to put them into form, to pass them on to anyone who may care to take them up.”― Robert Henri

The good news is that you cannot help but make these ideas valuable. You may not regard everything as a gem but your life, your thoughts, your specific background are all unique to you. A writer who grew up in ,say, a small town may be able to create a very authentic setting for a work of art based on her own background but might overlook the possibility out of boredom with her upbringing. It is often the things familiar to us that we can convey with the most insight and authority; yet it is often these things that we overlook.

I would try to find some ideas you're excited about(designs, concepts, political/philosophical ideas, kung fu moves, cheesy 80s horror movies w/e; it doesn't really matter as long as you're pumped about it) and convey them visually. If nothing excites you I would continue to explore your interests, expose yourself to new ideas and try to recall the ideas that excited you to take up this course in the first place.

"Well it's nice to see that so many people are interested in anatomy. We have to remember that it's very much the scientific side of art; and that art is much more important than just techniques. But I talk largely about techniques, as you know."
-Robert Beverly Hale

“A common defect of modern art study is that too many students do not know why they draw.”
― Robert Henri

“A tree growing out of the ground is as wonderful today as it ever was. It does not need to adopt new and startling methods.”
― Robert Henri


Keep watering your tree. Others will see its growth before you do similarly to how one may visit a relative after a long period of time and be told they've grown taller without having been aware of it themselves. Good luck.

It's nice to see someone else studying Scott Eaton(I'm assuming his course is where you got those pictures of the mr. natural universe dude); I feel like he's one of the most undeservedly overlooked anatomists
Seeing your sketchbook has motivated me to work harder. So thanks :)

edit: wow this is a lot longer than I thought it'd be :/ haha

This is my sketchbook if you're up for trying to help me flounder about less...yeah .__.

http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/showthre...7#pid82417
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#69
Hey man thanks for the comment on my SB. I think you could focus more on drawing accurately. Really try to see the mistakes as you make them. Remember to flip the canvas and take a break and come back if you need to. Go slow and focus all your attention on what you're doing. Sometimes you might catch yourself thinking about other things like what you want to eat for lunch or how a kid stepped on your sandcastle when you were 6. Just place the thought aside without judgement and focus on the current mark you're placing down. Keep it up!

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#70
Hey Kurt,

I brought that animation thread over here as well: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-6747.html

Sorry, I don't know any animation community, especially not for action shows. The few that I came across seemed to focus more on silly animations. 

I think you should give a shot because you seemed pretty interested. Even if its practicing turning cubes in space I think its good practice. In a way you can "check your answers" when you play the animation and see if the cube turns correctly or not.

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#71
Wooop its time to update. sorry i havent been consistent in uploading as i find that it takes up so mcuh time and also i dont have much to upload.

drawing the figure from imagination still proves to be difficult but , its definitely improving if i can say so myself.

remember when i say im going to do the bargue studies? welp didnt finish them. i ended up doing other stuff primarily figure drawing, i really need to commit to what im saying like really, dude just do it, stop screwing yourself by setting up a challenge but then youre never gonna do it.

my main focus would be perspective for this month. so yeah might not be able to post much stuff as those are boring stuff.

crappy stuffs are from imagination. because yeah
[Image: application%202%20copy.jpg]
[Image: Application%201%20copy.jpg]
[Image: imagination%202%20copy.jpg][Image: insitde%20out%20copy.jpg][Image: Jin%20kim%20study%20copy.jpg][Image: gest%20copy.jpg][Image: Untitled-1%20copy.jpg][Image: suck%20at%20selfies%2026%20copy.jpg][Image: Still%20life%206%20copy.jpg][Image: MAster%20study.jpg][Image: villpu%20figure%20studies.jpg]

this one is interesting... i just watched inside out so i made a fanart about it (whos your friend who wants to play?)
im still working on it, stuck with painting. as always.
[Image: baby%20riley%20and%20bing%20bong%20copy.jpg][Image: baby%20riley%20and%20bing%20bong2.jpg]


P.S: dropping this here for future reference. i played this game just a lil bit, and i loved how it represented so much of the culture it wishes to convey. really inspiring stuff. i hope to see more games just like this of different cultures and ethnicity.
https://vimeo.com/134310217

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#72
Hey, thanks for the link, hee. Also, great studies. It's looking a bit lopsided on that lovely lady figure-- Pay attention to symmetry and measuring parts against one another-- Landmarks are important. The pit of the neck, the belly button, things like that. Pay attention to where they are in respect to other parts of the body. If you can master the pelvis, you've got most of the work done, I think. The whole body's positioning is dependent on how the pelvis is turned.

Your work looks great-- Working on perspective is a grreeeaatt ideeaaa.. I really should too, but I'm also caught up in the figure lately.

Keep working hard! It really is paying off.

Sketchblag

 Join our Study Group: The Velvet Revolvers!  Let's work hard together!
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#73
Hey man! It's been a few months since I saw your sketchbook - I can see loads and loads of progress! You're working hard and getting good ^^

Seems your figure and gesture stuff turns out much more solid than the still life's and selfies. Could it be that you are more relaxed when you do them? Do you feel less pressure to get them right? (or just that you are more comfortable with fitting together those kinds of forms and masses)

Whatever that state of mind you have when you do those, try to take note of it and when you do the still life / self-portraits try to figure out what's different. For me, when I pressure myself, I tense up, hold the pencil tight, my lines don't look as good then I end up rushing and draw stuff I'm not happy with and then feel bad about it. If that happens to you too try to come up with some techniques to stop that (for me I just stop and draw really really really slowly, every line I take one breath and think before I lay it down - doing that for a bit seems to clear away some tension).

Keep going man!

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#74
@Jyonny thanks dude! youre right i get really stressed out with the selfies/still life. i just need to do more of them.
thanks for the tip ill do them once i get back to doing them.

gonna dump some of the assignments i did on amits environment mentorship programme. this dude is the man!
[Image: weyuru.jpg]
[Image: JeremyKurt_week12.jpg]
[Image: JeremyKurt_week3.jpg]

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#75
Hey there! Lots of work here! [Image: thumbs_up.png]
Great work with the last enviros, the sketches are very diverse and interesting (aso love me some of that madspartan!)

Man, looking at your studies I feel like the keyword is ACCURACY. Construction studies are the best exercise (IMO), but I think doing some more "literal copying", "academic" studies (line drawings) would benefit you long term. It seems to me that you are relying too much on your own knowledge of construction instead of observing the construction of whatever you are studying (which will, in turn, improve your knowledege). Also, better portraits. YES.

But please don't get me wrong. Don't go too crazy on the accuracy thing, it can be a rabbit hole (I've been there...). Just a quick "stint". Get what you need from it and let it go.

And I think I have just the thing to help you: https://gumroad.com/l/accuracy (great guide, and you can get it for free if you need it!)

Keep up the good work!

Also, if anyone has any thoughts on the academic x structure debate let's get-a-talking! [Image: wink.png]
( I'm sooo lonely sob[Image: sad.png]...any topic is fine...jk I actually enjoy this topic hahaha)

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#76
Gasp its the new year already!? man time flies. 
my skill however is still at an undesired state as i may say. anyhow.
what ive been trying to pursue in this months is still anatomy as usual and gesture drawing from photos though i try to mix things up with still lifes and full on figure studies.
but im also doing zbrush right now trying to sculpt what ive learned about doing the anatomy studies.
i do find out the benefits of doing 3d and theyre particularly helpful when done alongside drawing studies.

I try to pump out imagination sketches after all of these though i dont like doing them cos i suck at them.

[Image: figure%201.jpg] [Image: gesture%204.jpg]
[Image: figure%202.jpg]
[Image: study.jpg]
[Image: Environment%20design%20scrap.jpg]
[Image: ISASL.jpg]
[Image: Project%201.jpg]
[Image: Studyyyy.jpg]
[Image: Untitled-1.jpg]
[Image: Environment%20Design%20Rocks%20final%20week.jpg]

the last one was from Amit's mentorship program, Environment Design rocks!
ive watched the last crit and it was really insightful! so thanks amit if you're reading this!
im disappointed as to the quality of the work i have put out but just like you said were improving even though it doesnt look like it. if for you it looks like that i have improved then ill take it.

i have learned alot this past year and i hope to learn even more this coming 2016.

=========

i got to mention. this coming February ill be taking my shot at going to work. i am already 20 so i thought i really need to give it a go just for experience and to overcome my social anxiety that has since plague me this past 3 years of locking myself up at this room in pursuit of mastery and greatness.

i dont know how its gonna turn out. but i have faith that this is for the good. ill have less time to work on my skills but in turn having this constraint will hopefully make me more focused and spend my remaining time more wisely.

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#77
Hey man, you're doing really great, it's easy to say as an older person and hard to see when you're younger but you really have your whole life ahead of you, just 20 years old and making this consistent effort you will be an incredible artist! I found this video really motivating:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cdUASEaDZyc

About the social stuff - it's just practice, same as art. In fact so much of what we do in art is like a microcosm of life in good ways to approach things to get where we want to be. Consistent effort, noting the failings but learning from them instead of dwelling on them, keeping on trying again, not being too precious about things. I've had social issues in my life and got over them by volunteering at a community radio station and in the end they put me on air doing my own show, then I had to teach new volunteers how to use the equipment. It was terrifying but I did it and failed a bit and did it some more and now am much more confident in talking to people and in front of people. I'm telling you that stuff to say that if you want to get over that stuff, try and put yourself into a situation where you will push yourself to do stuff you aren't usually comfortable with (just like with art), but in a not too extreme way in a place where people are supportive and build up to it slowly (just like art as well!). Some kind of daily chanting or meditation practice really helps with that stuff too - with that stuff you focus solely on where you want to be, and disregard all problems since giving time to those thoughts drags them with you into the future. Eventually the stuff you want to do feels like it is seeking you out instead of the other way around. I can tell you more about that stuff if you want to try it sometime.

The anatomy stuff and gestures are looking really great too. I like the minimal look of the first figure. Since you have a good sense of proportion, you could try looking at the shadow shapes more - use the minimum amount of lines you need to lay in the pose then build it up by painting in the shadow shapes, I've been trying it recently and it's really fun and you can be surprised how dramatic stuff starts looking. Best of luck with everything.

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#78
Hey man, nice sketchbook, especially your traditional stuff really shows, that you have a grasp of drawing and values. It is not unusual, that those skills take a back-seat when adopting a new tool like PS becomes the primary goal.

It would suggest, that you check ctrl-paint for basic PS skill development: http://www.ctrlpaint.com/library <<< here look at digital painting 101. Do some of those exercises, as your brushwork really needs improvement. Your digital drawings actually are getting better, but you don't seem to get your brushwork in the paintings to be nice. And if you don't do nice brushwork, the painting won't magically look good.

As for technique-tips, try using clipping masks, and really seperate your work-steps from one another. Eytan Zana is a good example, he has some gumroad tuts on it, although they don't teach more than how to use a clipping mask. Check out http://onepixelbrush.com/tutorials/ <<< Shaddy Safadi's tutorials for this, they are great, he actually knows what he is talking about.

Also sorry for saying that, but I don't think it was wise, to invest in an environment class right away. I did the same thing, doing a schoolism course were I couldn't get much out of it because I struggled with things, my tutor was expecting I know how to do.

Practice drawing lines, curves, ellipses. Than start shading the ellipses to balls and draw boxes in perspective and shade those too. Then you can start with color. If you start with doing colored environments you will make mistakes on the way to the finish, that you don't understand because the are buried under thick layers of different concepts (values, color, composition, material, story...)

So enjoy that you are in the beginning and started so early. Develop those core skills and just have patience. Btw that salt-spender-thingie on the first page has really nice values. Keep doing those real life value studies and you will improve in no time.

Will be back here


Please help me getting better by checking out my sketchbook

HOMEPAGE http://floart.weebly.com
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#79
Thanks for dropping by :)

I just want to encourage you to keep going. I'll wait until you post your next studies to give any actual critique/advice, but in the mean time, don't give up!
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#80
I needed the update


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