Darktiste Sketchbook
I see you still mostly refuse to take on board valid feedback and continue on in a stubborn way with your 'phases' of work that aren't much related to solid fundamental study that may actually have helped you spend much less than a week rendering a completely flat side on view of basic shapes with no dimension to them. Not to be mean about the gun. It's ok I suppose. The silhouettes were solid. BUT

Do you understand I wonder how important being able to draw what you see well, in the first instance, is to pretty much everything that follows on? You seem to have a strange idea of how these things fit together? This is not what a concept artist even does. Your pistol for example, can be downloaded as a free file from anywhere on the web with much better render or as a photo and then adapted in less than a day to provide many more iterations of design.

Repeating again only what many people have said already, Why do you not learn how to draw well first and understand how these fundamentals actually come together before using digital tricks and processes to do the easiest most basic thing, instead of learning the hard stuff that you claim is easy? Do you believe it is some trick that people are trying to pull on you when it is suggested? I have not met a single high level concept designer that advocates for disregarding practicing fundamental drawing skills as much as you appear to do. Where do you get your study/project ideas on what to work on from?
Reply
(11-28-2019, 09:44 PM)Who Wrote: I see you still mostly refuse to take on board valid feedback and continue on in a stubborn way with your 'phases' of work that aren't much related to solid fundamental study that may actually have  helped you spend much less than a week rendering a completely flat side on view of basic shapes with no dimension to them. Not to be mean about the gun. It's ok I suppose. The silhouettes were solid. BUT

Do you understand I wonder how important being able to draw what you see well, in the first instance, is to pretty much everything that follows on? You seem to have a strange idea of how these things fit together?  This is not what a concept artist even does. Your pistol for example, can be downloaded as a free file from anywhere on the web with much better render or as a photo and then adapted in less than a day to provide many more iterations of design.

Repeating again only what many people have said already, Why do you not learn how to draw well first and understand how these fundamentals actually come together before using digital tricks and processes to do the easiest most basic thing, instead of learning the hard stuff that you claim is easy? Do you believe it is some trick that people are trying to pull on you when it is suggested? I have not met a single high level concept designer  that advocates for disregarding practicing fundamental drawing skills as much as you appear to do. Where do you get your study/project ideas on what to work on from?
I am a stubborn person it not a new thing because i actually have a plan of action but people keep suggesting stuff to add to this plan of action that derail the feeling that i am in control of the direction that lead me toward my goal.As much as i would like to believe any criticism is constructive i don't do this as an hobby therefor it make me appear rigid to those who have no idea of why and frankly i don't have to much time explaining myself but i guess i care enough about your criticism to give you more information on my situation.

Now let get into your question define what is drawing well? I only got my work to speak for itself when it come to showing what fundamental i am miss and i totally see why people get piss to see 2d render and it reaching a point were it almost like i am a fraud or something clearly people want also to see the traditional side of my work because it matter to artist. Idk what to show people to convince them that i understand the fundamental maybe i am just pretending to understand them i am certainly not perfect in my fundamental i am not trying to convince anyone at all that maybe why i am not showing this kind of stuff in here.I am not even trying to disagree with you fundamental are important i simply got no love for them in here in particular.My fundamental should still transpire through my work i believe.No?Clearly i am not a beast when it come to perspective not a beast when it come to light and shadow.

''Where do you get your study/project ideas on what to work on from?''

I have taken some art class and i have a collection of book and video but now i am on my own.I am making my own course that touch many aspect of concept art.I have took the time to try and also searched what were the branch of concept art i was interested in.My project help me explore those area.Those project lead toward a portfolio.For example right now i am touching many different era of weapon design and costume design.I also have an interest for creature design i have touch environnement design but i saw that it was more than i could chew back than and probably still is for me right now.

I am gonna end here as to leave space for you to answers and not get to lost in what i say.

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply
[Image: B0T2Vza.gif]

:)

If you are reading this, I most likely just gave you a crappy crit! What I'm basically trying to say is, don't give up!  
----
IG: @thatpuddinhead
Reply
i hope this sb becomes a meme one day lolol

70+Page Koala Sketchbook: http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-3465.html SB

Paintover thread, submit for crits! http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-7879.html
[color=rgba(255, 255, 255, 0.882)]e owl sat on an oak. The more he saw, the less he spoke.[/color]
Reply
Is anybody reminded of the eyeball scorpion and wasp thread from the ol Conceptart days?
Reply
Ok, I'm far from the best person to have this conversation with but:

I think we all need to back track a bit, it seems we are having some communication problems,  to begin with, just to address the comment about the fundamentals, Darktiste, we can't really gauge how good you are at them if you aren't posting your draftsmanship practice; fundamentals are tricky, and one of the biggest problems with learning them is that you are basically pushing your brain to process information you don't even know you can process, often in abstract instinctive ways you aren't yet familiar with, which makes judging your own skill kind of impossible, you can look at someone who is better than you and somewhat recognise that, but until you are close to their level of skill, you won't really understand how they -specifically- are better; I think you should post your draftsmanship/perspective/observation practice here just to get someone else's opinion on them, again, talking from experience here, it's really hard to gauge your fundamental skill, because a lot the process of learning things like perspective or getting better at observation is literally about getting good enough to see your own mistakes, some strict drawing courses may make this task more straight forward, but as far as we know, you aren't following those.


Putting that to the side for a bit, I think it would be useful to step back even further, Darktiste, why don't you post a few images of industry work you like (in the case you are trying to go pro) that is similar to what you are going for in your practice, m
aybe that would give us a better idea of what you are trying to do. Not everybody needs to be insane at perspective or even observation, it all depends on what you wanna do, and there definitely are jobs in the industry for people who are very good at other things.


Generally the fundamentals of art are considered -give or take- to be something along the lines of composition/design, perspective, anatomy/morphology, and light (color + value), but there are other fundamentals that apply to whatever task you are trying to fulfill, depending on your position in a team, you may be dealing with things like acting, physical processes (from ontogeny to erosion), rhythm (musical, visual), and other technical skills regarding the hardware or software you use; depending on if you work on extinct animal reconstruction, character animation, enviornment art, texture design, weapon design, your drawing and modelling skills will often rest on an understanding of these things, especially if you are working with multiple mediums, and your designs have to be manageable in all of them, such as is the case in concept design, where often you design in one or multiple mediums that aren't the final one(film, game, architecture, concert show, whatever), and during the process of making an asset, multiple people will have to translate and rework your designs, this fundamental understanding I'm talking about is that will let you set the boundaries of what the design can be, what can be rotated, moved, softened, hardened etc. to adapt it to these different mediums without breaking the intended effect of the design.

A solid understanding of these things does (in some cases) make traditional drawing skill not as important, even observation can take a backseat depending on the pipeline of the project, but again, I'd be skeptical of entirely relying on oneself to gauge that, a second opinion from someone more skilled, or ideally someone who does the type of work you want to do would be best, maybe we can offer some help in this forum but there's better places, many artists offer quick mentorships for a low price, tom scholes for example does weapons, as well as environments and 2d assets, you can buy an hour of his time for 90$ on patreon and probably ask him all the questions you want, if money is a problem, maybe just shoot him an email, he might respond. If what he does isn't what you wanna do, maybe find somebody else and try your luck with an email.

I might edit this post and rewrite some stuff.


Reply
Here some image Gliger

I like simple stuff to be honest.Creating different design with a theme is always something that motivate me to draw.Right now i explore the theme of weaponry in different era.With sometime costume that fit the same era.I have done some props design in the past to.


Attached Files Image(s)






My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply
Very cool images!, the first is 3d, are you trying out building any of these weapons in 3d so you have a better understanding of what your designs have to achieve and how they have to be interpreted? it's becoming more and more common for game artists to be able to design, and for designers to be able to build the final assets themselves, 2d or 3d, especially when we talk about indie projects, most of which won't bother to budget for a concept artist when they could just have the 3d/pixel/2d artist design the assets themselves. 
Even if you don't want to go for sculpting/modelling jobs, the understanding you get from actually building these designs in something close to what will be the final medium is invaluable, nowadays 3d is stupidly easy, blender and unreal are free, and unreal comes with lots of megascans assets, combined with quixel mixer you can quickly start testing out your designs for free, houdini has a free apprentice version, and if you are into fashion you should definitely look into marvelous/clo3d, while there's a learning period to any software, nowadays it's from a few hours to barely a few days for most, and fundamental drawing skills perfectly overlap, seriously, modelling is just drawing, the only difference is you get to move the depth axis around, but it's the same feeling as 2d drawing.

I'm getting a bit repetitive but are you making sure to take the final products into consideration?, making pretty concept illustrations is great and very inspiring, but ultimately they are gonna become 2d or 3d assets, be that for a movie, or a tabletop game miniature or a videogame, they gotta be castable, or printable, or riggable, movable etc. solid perspective skills make a lot of these things very easy to take into account because you would be easily able to visualize in your head whether the armor you designed is going to clip into itself when a character moves or not, plus lots of other things like how figures and products feel to the touch , how easily the hierarchies and smaller rhythms of the design are going to be translated into a lower poly model, or into a 2d sprite that will bend and warp; solid perspective skills let you visualize and break down all these things in the early stages, saves you time, saves your team time. And when it comes to things like how a piece of armor is engineered, what it has to do, how to has to hang off the body or be tied to it, the understanding of space you get from practicing perspective really hard makes all those problems very logical and the solutions intuitive.

If you aren't trying to go for building game assets and you wanna stick to the more illustration-y side of design, things like item icons, or armor illustrations for tabletop handbooks and such, well, that's just drawing and graphic design skill, that's studying aesthetics, learning about shape language, and learning to translate things into a consistent style, types of things that become easier to learn when you do batches of work in a similar style instead of single one off pieces, pushing your observation, learning to recognise proportions and rhythms better.

You mentioned an interest in creature design, and, imo, unless you are going for very abstract 2d creatures, the level of drawing you need to comfortably break down and design animal anatomy is pretty high, you have to deal with several layers of materials (bone, muscle, fascia, fat, scales, fur...) coordinating all of them at once, balancing them out, getting shapes to go soft and go hard in specific places consistently, being able to make them squash and stretch, practicing fundamentals will make the process of learning this stuff so much faster and easier so you can spend more time learning about cladistics, comparative anatomy, ecology and all that other stuff that goes hand in hand with creatures.

I mean, look at people like carlos huante or edayan and the rest of the monster hunter capcom crew, terryl whitlatch, aaron blaise, ville sinkkonen or even wayne barlowe,  they wouldn't be able to do what they do without very solid fundamentals, improving your draftsmanship pushes how much information you can comfortably process, which ultimately lets you make better decisions, use reference more effectively, and correct things without having to guess as much.

Also, in the end if you wanna be able to light something, there's tricks you can use to make forms pop, strong terminators, pillow shading and whatever else, but ultimately correct rendering is just linear perspective on steroids, being able to comfortably track points in space, really understanding the angles of the planes that make up your design is what any later decisions about how you want to graphically represent your design rest upon, almost meaning that if you can't light something properly, you don't really know what's happening spatially with your design (local values, materials, atmospheric perspective, sss etc. are a different conversation), which in a way makes it a cool exercise to keep your perspective skills in check.

I guess to wrap it all up, even if you didn't want to build 3dimensional stuff, the images you've posted show a strong understanding of shape language and aesthetics, things like balance, echoing, transition, opposition etc. skills that are forever going to be limited by how well you can perceive distances and angles, qualities of line and shape, color, value, stuff you learn from practicing observation, are you practicing your observation skills regularly? can you accurately recognise and replicate angles, curves etc.? the better you are at that, the less time you'll spend fighting your lines, and the better you'll be at recognising what gives a design its character. Multiple people have already listed -in several threads- books, programs/courses and exercises you can do to practice your observation, from copying photos, to still lifes, to all other kinds of things,  I'm sure we've all seen them.

Also, just a couple questions, how many hours of actual drawing/designing practice do you put in weekly, and what are your goals in terms of jobs, is there any specific position you want, a company, or a project you'd like to make/work on.

Last thing, I hope you know Trent Kaniuga, he has a youtube channel, talks a lot about learning and practicing, does a lot of stuff similar to what you've posted, he's been working for a couple decades now, so his career could be a good example of the "extra stuff" you might need to get good at if you want to do this for a living.

Also, I'm being kind of vague because I don't want to start recommending plans or resources before I really get what you are going for.


Reply
In term of hour right now i am at 11 hour per week.And aim to Increasingly about around 1 hour per month and working toward consistent 15 to 20 hour per week.Right now i am also looking at the job scene checking into the historic of the studio that speak to me.When it come to what exactly i am into it design but realistically as you put it i think it realistic to say that i will be utilizing 3d tool in a near future.

Yes i know about trent kaniuaga, terryl whitlach, aaron blaise and even wayne barlowe here a few other name i know from the top of my head bobby chui,peter han,scott robertson,marc brunet,anthony jone,hardy folwer just to name those.

I want to thank the community for it honesty there time and support even if i show alot of stubbornness a bit of ruff love is was all keep us going i think.

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply
This is a VERY long post. I'm Sorry. It's the way I'm wired, to blab endlessly.

TL;DR:
Your understanding and approach to what it takes to be a serious career industry artist and not a hobbyist appears to have some major flaws at this stage and requires serious reevaluation. Go back and read all the advice you have ever been given here. Ask yourself if it is all bad and to be discarded. If the answer is yes, well...I guess, best of luck to you and I'll see you here another 6 years down the track
. [Image: 1f4aa][Image: 1f601]

I definitely don't want you to feel like we are ganging up on you or mocking you, though you do invite it. The intention here is to help you see what you cannot in your approach to your work. That is the whole point of posting stuff in a sketchbook on a forum like this, is it not? 

Quote: i don't do this as an hobby therefor it make me appear rigid to those who have no idea of why and frankly i don't have to much time explaining myself but i guess i care enough about your criticism to give you more information on my situation.

Well thank you for the glory of being given your attention, I should be grateful I suppose.
  [Image: 1f602][Image: 1f64f] 
Your understanding of the difference between a hobbyist and a "serious" artist is perplexing and a little bit worrying. Do you think having a rigid mindset is the way to success? It's probably the exact opposite. I have seen lifelong hobbyists who don't care one bit to do this as a career, be more open to learning and feedback than you are. 
Really ask yourself what is going on here? Are you mistaking rigidity and stubbornness which are problematic traits that are usually obstacles to learning, with persistence which is a beneficial trait in the long run? I think it is likely this is the case. What do you think?

Since you asked in what i feel is an actual sincere desire to understand, I will bother one last time to use more of my own precious time in formulating an answer in the hope that you may actually get something of value from it for once.    
Quote:Idk what to show people to convince them that i understand the fundamental maybe i am just pretending to understand them My fundamental should still transpire through my work i believe.No?Clearly i am not a beast when it come to perspective not a beast when it come to light and shadow.
Quote: Idk what to show people to convince them that i understand the fundamental i am certainly not perfect in my fundamental i am not trying to convince anyone at all that maybe why i am not showing this kind of stuff in here.

You contradict yourself here, but in any event, why do you think you need to convince us you understand fundamentals? 
That isn't even the issue.
For those of us with more experience and skill than you, it is patently obvious that you clearly and repeatedly have many obvious issues with basic drawing and painting fundamentals, both in what you do post and in the manner and content of how you critique others. That there are some major glaring deficiencies in your skill and understanding is not something debatable. What IS debatable is what work you do behind the scenes. You do seem to be fearful of actually having that put to any actual rigorous test through the kind people here in this forum. 
If that's the case...why on earth are you actually on here? What improvement do you hope to get?
I hope you are getting critique on your work somewhere else then in any event.


If you don't know what to show for real: Show people your basic drawing and draftsmanship attempts from observation and from imagination.  Show us your figure studies, Show us your illustrative composition designs and studies. Show us your perspective focused work. Show us your master painting studies. Show us your value studies. Show us your shape language studies. Show us your life drawing. Show us your industrial design marker sketches. Yes also finally you can show us some design processes and work. Show us literally anything that anyone else on this forum shows. My bet is, it won't convince anyone of anything that deviates much from the impression they already have formed from seeing what you do post.


Quote:I am not even trying to disagree with you fundamental are important i simply got no love for them in here in particular 
 
You think you are here to get love for your fundamentals, or are you saying you have no love for learning some of these fundamental aspects? 
If the former, who do you think you are; Darktiste, Jesus of Drawing: The Second Coming? 
Are you here to learn with humility or are you here to accept the adoration of the poor dirty masses of other artists who appear to be here for some strange reason, working on their own fundamentals and asking for help by actually posting the hard work and development that they struggle with? Christ on a stick. It is not so complicated. 
[Image: 1f635]

Actually people did respond to your fundamental exercises. Go back in your own sketchbook and have a look.You used to do this. 
Here is a hand study you did last year 
http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-3...#pid118666
How about now? We have no idea where you are with drawing hands. I hope you know.

How about this. 
http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/attachme...7068/9.jpg
Also last year. Probably your most successful basic perspective sketch showing form with line. People gave you feedback. How about now? I hope you know.

http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/thread-3...#pid118964
You posted right underneath it. What happened? Did you do those "feng zhu style" sketches or flag them? I hope you know.

Two years ago
http://crimsondaggers.com/forum/attachme...4660/9.png

Are these radically different from what you are producing now? Sure, you learned to pillow shade a flat shape digitally and use the lasso tool. I would argue those old line drawings were actually better to see first pass design than what you are doing now given efficiency of likely time taken. Are you ok with this? I hope you know.

Quote:
Quote:I am a stubborn person it not a new thing because i actually have a plan of action but people keep suggesting stuff to add to this plan of action that derail the feeling that i am in control of the direction that lead me toward my goal.

Have you  ever considered that perhaps your plan of action is flawed in one or many ways? Have you built in the ability to incorporate new information into your plan of action? If there is a conflict between your plan and other's advice, how do you judge whether it is constructive or not and resolve it? If something is repeated by multiple people many times over and over, do you think they are all deluded, or do you think there may be some consensus view that may have some validity to it that is worth examining seriously? In my observation, you seem to mostly and consistently ignore the more important (and often repeated) advice, rather than resolve or incorporate it.

Quote: I would like to believe any criticism is constructive i don't do this as an hobby therefor it make me appear rigid to those who have no idea of why and frankly i don't have to much time explaining myself  
 
This is the pattern i see with you. You get very relevant feedback, you excuse it away because it somehow does not align with your magical grail of a "plan". So you ignore it and go right back to your overly engineered rigid plan as if it's always the better choice. This type of stubborn hardheadedness is not a benefit to you, or something to be proud of. 
It is most likely holding you back from making better course corrections and improving the efficiency in which you learn and improve. 

Do we have to show you our portfolios and cite our resumes before you give anybody any creedence at all?  I actually did write it all down, and then decided to save the poor other people reading this. He really won't listen unless we are Craig fucking Mullins anyway.

There are still one or maybe two highly skilled artists who for some reason help people on this forum. I don't want to speak for them, but you seem to have such little idea what a fantastic resource they could be for you on understanding those fundamentals. It makes my head spin to see what an opportunity you are discarding because of a rigid adherence to your "plan". 

There is a mindset issue here regardless of your skill or practice habits. 
The fact that you don't like having the "feeling of losing control" is exactly what is preventing you from allowing new information into your carefully curated plan. Now that you are on your "plan" you don't appear to want to change anything.  Do you know what this is called? It's fear. 

In life it's better to work with the reality that you aren't always going to be able to control everything and that even the process of learning is to be in a state of relative uncertainty for much of the time. 
The nice thing about actually coming to terms with your fear is: freedom. It allows you to loosen up and be open to more possibilities than are within your comprehension at any particular time.  That's just life.
Now apply that to art. What makes you think it is any different? 
I'll eat my underpants if you have succeed in controlling everything in exactly the way you predetermined in even one small single aspect of your life.

I have observed many people struggle with mindset related problems when self teaching, and I believe it is as useful to be mindful of the patterns present in your own mindset, if not more so,than the technical side of learning the skills required to make highly skilled art. They go hand in hand really. Right now whatever your claim of skills, your mindset and understanding of any of what we are talking about is clearly the most problematic thing.

Some people more intuitively get things done and have a natural growth mindset that keeps them open to new things and learning. 
Some people need to be reminded....repeatedly. 
Some will never get it.
Which do you see yourself being?

Quote:Now let get into your question define what is drawing well? I only got my work to speak for itself when it come to showing what fundamental i am miss and i totally see why people get piss to see 2d render and it reaching a point were

If you wish a good brief synopsis of what drawing actually is...read Tristan's post on approaches to it in DemonLizardman's sketchbook a few posts ago. Probably better than most you will find online because it's formed in experience and considered thought and research.  Have you ever approached drawing observationaly in any of these ways?  

Quote: it almost like i am a fraud or something clearly people want also to see the traditional side of my work because it matter to artist.    

No we don't want to see your traditional drawings because "it matter to artist". You are implying  it is pointless to know what other artists with more experience than you, think of your technical work? It matters because these have a direct relation to what you say you are trying to achieve with your work.  If we can't see them, we cannot provide feedback that you can use. It is just this simple. I can't understand where your gap in understanding is with this concept. Perhaps you can think about it and let us know? You constantly ask others for their references, their study, their layins, their processes. Ever wonder what it's like the other way around if  they didn't? That's my experience with you.

Do you need to be the best observational draftsman or painter in the world to do concept design? No of course not. Do you have to be at least above averagely passable in your skill. YES. Of course YES. Again. YES.  Will being better at drawing help you do a 2d design job? Do I really even need to answer this? 
[Image: 1f644]

If you only use a 3d process or use VR or want to only model, or slot in some other niche tech area of the pipeline, sure, that's a very different path. All the nuances of what Gliger mentioned while valid, I feel is just going to confuse you even further.
 
Focus on the simplest most basic things first. Do you want to draw and paint, to depict recognizable objects in lighting situations using 2d tools?  If the answer is yes, how much simpler can it get, than learning to draw and paint objects in all forms of different situations / lighting / perspective as the priority?

You comment on many other's sketchbooks about composition, about values, about edges, about perspective, about accuracy. Do you wonder why you get no comments of the same ilk back. Why? 
Because others are posting much of their studies and final work that aspires to be something, hit some quality and exhibit some or all of these principles. As Tristan mentioned earlier...I am just repeating this, it is easy to critique them. They make it easy. THAT's their goal. They invite the help. You don't seem to want it. You push it away.  It is almost impossible to critique your fundamental abilities because you aren't showing any of your work on them. 

I haven't seen any real anatomy or figure study in two years. Oh that's right, according to your "plan" studying the legs and anatomy of the human figure is pointless because it will be covered by pants or shoes in any "concept work". I truly wondered at that point, if you actually believed the ridiculousness of this idea or if you were now just trolling. I wish you were trolling.
It is like pulling teeth to get you to even take on board any meaningful feedback. At some point people will just begin to ignore you out of frustration at your hardheadedness. Have you perhaps noticed this happening already?

It is very frustrating to watch you operate coming from a perspective of wanting to help. Some might argue it's highly amusing. For me it's both. I'm not even sure why I am back here.
Something in me still wants to help for some unfathomable reason. My instincts are telling me I have wasted my hour typing this up. I am as bored writing it as I'm sure people are bored reading it by now.

If you believe you can be a "concept artist" without drawing or painting or studying the "boring" stuff in your own words, and getting relevant feedback on that side of things, well good luck to you. Don't be surprised if you are here 6 years later with a 500k view sketchbook and more 2d paper cutout flat guns and gloves to show us. 

I'm not sure I have the energy to reply again. I hope something helps. I'm tapping out. Peace
Reply
Just draw
Reply
So i did a study of this gun and i then did an adaption to practice extraction and subtracting form a 3d shape.


Attached Files Image(s)




My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply


The box are improving in my opinion.For perspective i recommend to continue with draw box. Scott stuff is kinda advanced it really technical stuff and if you can't nail one or two point perspective box it will feel like it out of your reach it just gonna be more confusing then anything.

If you are reading this, I most likely just gave you a crappy crit! What I'm basically trying to say is, don't give up!  
----
IG: @thatpuddinhead
Reply
I definitively can say that i was getting confuse between all the perspective that exist since i was not the one who was setting the perspective the ref was really bad at providing me boxy shape i could use to help me find the vanishing point and this cause me not to be able to keep it consistent in my own mind.The end of the gun is intentional modified but now that i look at it i am sure it also wrong since it clearly doesn't follow the perspective.Thank for the paint over also.Also now that i take a step back i think i was using linear perspective on the bottom will the rest was two point perspective.

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply
So i am getting ready for some mirroring exercise and so i though let make some perfect cube first.Just wanna see if i am getting the hang of the idea or not i am doubting because the second cube in the back as a strange boxy feel yet it still in the cone of vision idk why.The 2 cube aren't suppose to be mirrored but they should but both should be perfect cube.


Attached Files Image(s)



My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply
(12-04-2019, 08:08 PM)darktiste Wrote: So i am getting ready for some mirroring exercise and so i though let make some perfect cube first.Just wanna see if i am getting the hang of the idea or not i am doubting because the second cube in the back as a strange boxy feel yet it still in the cone of vision idk why.The 2 cube aren't suppose to be mirrored but they should but both should be perfect cube.

I thought I could drop in on this one since I went through those exercises last year. The problem I saw is that the measure points weren't at the right places. You want to construct an arc from the vanishing point across the direction of view, using as radius the length of the line from the vp to the station point or picture plane ground, don't recall the exact name of that spot (the bottom or top corner of the 90 degree circle of view). Remember there's also the diagonal vanishing point (dvp) to check things out! (divide the triangle corner formed between both VPs in half to find it, useful for when you do 60/30s or so).

Anyhow, I hope I didn't make a mistake myself since it's been a year since I did any of these but, here it goes. Back to working on my stuff. Best of luck!

Reply
Rotohail thank for the paint over i am still really bad with instruction and need some practice but i managed to find a sycra video on the topic if your interest to see how he approached the problem though i would share for your trouble.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYNBEFJeo-A

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply
I am doing a 100 box challenge in 2 point perspective but i am debating with myself if it worth posting.Anyone as good reason it would be worth posting?

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply
(12-05-2019, 02:49 AM)darktiste Wrote: Rotohail thank for the paint over i am still really bad with instruction and need some practice but i managed to find a sycra video on the topic if your interest to see how he approached the problem though i would share for your trouble.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uYNBEFJeo-A
I glazed over it the other day, he's doing the same I learn to do from:
https://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/tech10.html

But he's going at it the other way around? He starts with the plane for the box bottom and figures out the measure points and measure bars from there. You can go either way, draw first the circle of view and set the vps/mps or draw a cube then fit the circle and vps to it. So long you are consistent and keep the relations at work as they should be, it will be fine. That's the most important I think, you should look into why you have to keep certain angle relationships between the vps, and what lines converging mean, why there's distortions depending on where we view something from... that's the most important.
(12-07-2019, 03:00 AM)darktiste Wrote: I am doing a 100 box challenge in 2 point perspective but i am debating with myself if it worth posting.Anyone as good reason it would be worth posting?
Post it if you need feedback or are stuck, but if you are doing mechanical drawing or studies, once you get how to do one, the rest is applying the knowledge, nothing much else. In the case of studying you have an original, so you can tell if it's close or not to what you wanted it to be. In any case, ha, it's your thread man! Do as you feel is right!
Reply
Did a bit of personal project but i am gonna go back to draw some cube this week and drawing more complexe 3d object in perspective i need to present my stuff to an acceptable level.I did a more sticker feel to those one and practice drawing modern helmet.


Attached Files Image(s)



My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply


Forum Jump:


Users browsing this thread: 36 Guest(s)