Study Schedules
#61
I'm curious to know the result of this, I'm finally building a schedule for me to take study more seriously. I'm worried that if it is too difficult or complicated in the beggining, odds are that I'll lose motivation and that's bad :/ So, how it went for you guys? Now that you had been through it, is it any more tips on how to make and stick with a schedule? Thanks!
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#62
(12-30-2014, 11:09 AM)alexfreitas Wrote: I'm curious to know the result of this, I'm finally building a schedule for me to take study more seriously. I'm worried that if it is too difficult or complicated in the beggining, odds are that I'll lose motivation and that's bad :/ So, how it went for you guys? Now that you had been through it, is it any more tips on how to make and stick with a schedule? Thanks!

alexfreitas: Don’t make it too complicated or hard in the beginning, when you’re not experienced enough to really judge how long something will take you, how many hours of concentration you can fit into which part of your day etc … better start with some simple structure of times and contents, see how it goes, and then improve that schedule with what you feel works best for you. You can go as simple or complicated as you want, or start mixing things up if that helps keep you motivated! It’s all about finding out what works best for *you*.
And this is something that works different for everyone, but is super important for me: Don’t allow yourself to cheat and make exceptions when you want to build a habit (i.e. sticking to a schedule, or a new eating/exercising habit, or whatever). Be very very carful about allowing yourself to break your schedule for some reason, unless it’s honestly a *really* good reason (or has been scheduled in advance). Don’t lie to yourself here. Don’t be easy on yourself. Once you made one exception it will be way harder to stay disciplined later on. If you realize that your schedule doesn’t work, redesign it, it doesn’t have to be a rigid thing, but instead is there to help you get your work done.
(But again, this ‚no exceptions‘ thing is not for everyone, some work better with less hard rules. It’s how I seem to function, so I thought I’d share).

If you really need *extra* motivation, there’s some tools/crutches that help by appealing to your animalistic cravings like instant gratification, google for „habitrpg“, „chorewars“ or „dontbreakthechain“. I’d suggest not using tools like that if you can do without them though, relying internal motivation is always better!

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Every feedback is appreciated!
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#63
This is very good advice Lyraina, thanks! I'm into this productivity thing for a while, this really interests me! I'm actually in habitrpg for almost a year. Before that, I never could stick with flossing! haha But I'm not aware of the others you cited, I'm gonna check them, thanks!
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#64
Hey, uh...for what it's worth? A bit of an update.

My schedule has lapsed a bit since I last updated it, and I ended up opting for a more modular one that's a bit different from Dave's. That being said using a schedule and managing your time DOES work. Right now I'm balancing doing commission work, game design and learning. <_<

Also, Happy New Year.
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#65
I know this thread has been sleeping for over a year now, but I have to ask...

I've been looking into the schedules posted here, is there any reason why most studies end after an hour or so?

And does it mean you have to move on to another piece if the time is up? I've been trying to do these 1 hour studies, and it always leaves me feeling like I have to do 3 more hours on it after the times up.

It's debatable whether or not what you're trying to achieve is indeed impossible. One thing's for sure: it's impossible to defeat a person who doesn't know how to quit.
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#66
(02-12-2016, 07:14 PM)John Wrote: I know this thread has been sleeping for over a year now, but I have to ask...

I've been looking into the schedules posted here, is there any reason why most studies end after an hour or so?

And does it mean you have to move on to another piece if the time is up? I've been trying to do these 1 hour studies, and it always leaves me feeling like I have to do 3 more hours on it after the times up.

Human attention span is on average about 45 minutes, that might be a big part of the reason.

I find 30minutes-1 hour studies most effective depending on a subject. But of course it's good to spend more time to polish something up. If you feel like you need more time for a study then by all means use it. Everyone is different, some people like short studies, some like longer. Find what works for you and just do it.

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#67
(02-12-2016, 07:22 PM)Piotr Jasielski Wrote: Human attention span is on average about 45 minutes, that might be a big part of the reason.

I find 30minutes-1 hour studies most effective depending on a subject. But of course it's good to spend more time to polish something up. If you feel like you need more time for a study then by all means use it. Everyone is different, some people like short studies, some like longer. Find what works for you and just do it.

Awesome.

After reading your reply, there's this saying about 'fixing the foundations through rendering' that dawned on me. Around the 45 minute mark, I see myself just rendering for a huge amount of time at the end of the study, which in turn, defeats the reason why I'm studying.

Great advice. Thanks.

It's debatable whether or not what you're trying to achieve is indeed impossible. One thing's for sure: it's impossible to defeat a person who doesn't know how to quit.
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#68
(02-12-2016, 07:14 PM)John Wrote: I know this thread has been sleeping for over a year now, but I have to ask...

I've been looking into the schedules posted here, is there any reason why most studies end after an hour or so?

And does it mean you have to move on to another piece if the time is up? I've been trying to do these 1 hour studies, and it always leaves me feeling like I have to do 3 more hours on it after the times up.

What is it you are trying to get out of the study is a good question to ask yourself. Not all studies need to be completed to 100%. For example say you are doing a drapery study, and there are like 50 folds - it is not necessary to do all 50 of them, because your goal of the study isn't to produce a "completed picture". Your goal is to study folds until you feel like you've got what you came for. Maybe it takes you 20/50 folds drawn, maybe 35/50. Sometimes maybe it does take you 50/50.

The point is that the time doesn't matter nearly as much as having a concise reason for the study. When that reason is fulfilled, move on. Studies aren't meant to be polished, unless your doing a study to learn how to polish a piece. 

We have a natural disposition to want to polish things, but there's a time and place for that - and as counterproductive as it sounds, not everything needs to be "completed". Only your understanding of what you are studying needs to be "complete".
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#69
Alrighty! Time to finally contribute to this thread > incoming word vom and a lot or reiteration

When you're lost and you don't know how to begin a task you set out to do, then ok, search around and apply knowledge/templates already set by others. Use premade schedules if you have to and tinker with them a bit to work for you. After having used said schedule for a while and assessing whether it works for you and your goals or not - modify it to finetune it even more to your liking.

What I'm trying to get at is that -- depending on who you are as a person - you may not even work well with a schedule in the end lmao

I think we all know by now that the most important thing when it comes to not only study schedules - but various activities in our lives (exercise/dieting lifestyle/routines/art(!) etc) - is figuring out what the heck works best for you!

Personally, I've found that I thrive when using a schedule at this time in my life - this will probs change in the future - and I will adjust to change accordingly.
Here's an e.g. of an updated schedule I've been keeping to since mid-Jan 2016 some cool daggerz were asking what my schedule looks like in my sketchbookos, so here'tis. It makes for a wonderful wallpaper.




I have a free day set it stone on Tuesdays and an *optional Saturday day off 
(*if I feel burnout coming on/need to take a break or muscles will break - so far I haven't needed to)

Now, on the other hand, I know of many people who work better when writing out daily goals/tasks to be completed, or people who keep mental notes on what they wanna do for the day.
So yeah sure! By all means, give a schedule a shot, tailor it to your liking as much as you can so that you follow through with it for about a month. If it works and you're enjoying yourself, steady on! If not, keep playing with it, or completely trash it and keep hunting for a daily routine for art training you can stick with

Keep doing you, people

From Oz with Love,

poop 

<3

EDIT: See, its the future and now I find this schedule only kind of helpful. What I find to be really helpful atm - writing down weekly goals that add up and achieve main goals of the year -- and then set daily goals to achieve the weekly goals.

That simple!

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#70
Haha yay! I am happy to see this thread is still going :)
Going to try and bump here and update mine too.

Dang, I am going full own with two classes starting next month.

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