svc sketchbook
#1
I want to improve at drawing and painting. I enjoy creating and I don't have any ulterior goals other than to get good at something. I've studied for almost 2 years now.

Currently I'm studying portraiture. I haven't painted many people and studies of painting stretch out for hours. I want to be faster because I have only a little time each night to practice. Probably shouldn't be painting at all for a while because my drawing is weak but I prefer to paint so I indulged.

[Image: RPKVprf.png]
source painting by Ron Hicks

basic perspective study from last month
[Image: E8nKTQP.png]

I think I can learn to create faster so I can study faster and improve faster but I need some help optimizing my time spent for value gained.
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#2
Welcome to the forum svc! For only 2 years of work and limited practice time it looks like you've advanced a good deal (especially compared to myself at that stage, LOL).

THE FOLLOWING PARAGRAPHS ARE ONLY MY OPINION. YOU MAY DISAGREE AND OTHER MEMBERS MAY HAVE BETTER ADVICE.

If you want to paint, then paint. To some extent, painting improves drawing, and vice versa. But, since you're pressed for time, and as you've probably suspected already, sticking with drawing for now WOULD be faster for improving certain deficiencies. For example, in that portrait study you posted, there's some tilts and curves that aren't right (mainly in the neck and eyes), which would be more immediately obvious if you had done the study with lines, and you could make multiple attempts in the same amount of time that a painted study would require.

According to Frank Frazetta, you can learn all the anatomy you need through observation and by spending a single night on copying all of the drawings in an anatomy book or two. That might only work if you're Frank, but that's something to keep in mind for your time-pressed study sessions, LOL.

Let us know what books and resources you're working with. I see a circle of view in that perspective image; have you been looking at handprint.com?
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#3
Hey svc, welcome to CD. I just want to touch on the aspect of time and speed since you've mentioned it several times. I think it's most artist's goals to be quicker at the craft (hell, it's one of my goals too) but unfortunately that is not always the case. But, speed does come over time. The more you practice and understand what you are drawing and painting, you will naturally become faster and gain momentum.

I guess I'm just trying to say; don't get too caught up in needing to be 'fast' - it's better to do things correctly than quickly. You will learn more by going slower as opposed to trying to fly through things. Speed will come with time :)

Sketchbook // Insta 

And though the course may change sometimes, rivers always reach the sea
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#4
Unrelated to what you guy are talking about but if you intend on posting regularly it would be a good idea to make your work fit the forum size format else it just tiny picture with not alot to critic since there ant size and any detail will be erase.I mean it almost impossible at that scale to tell if you did a perspective error or not.

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
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#5
darktiste: Since he hosted the images on another site, you can see larger versions if you right click and hit "View Image". But yeah, svc, adding the images as attachments would be best. That way we can enlarge them without opening another tab and avoid this "WHAT IS THIS? A PICTURE FOR ANTS????" issue. Use this site to compress your images if they're a billion megabytes, there is almost no noticeable quality loss: https://tinypng.com/
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#6
(05-14-2020, 10:58 AM)Pubic Enemy Wrote: Welcome to the forum svc! For only 2 years of work and limited practice time it looks like you've advanced a good deal (especially compared to myself at that stage, LOL).
...
If you want to paint, then paint. To some extent, painting improves drawing, and vice versa. But, since you're pressed for time, and as you've probably suspected already, sticking with drawing for now WOULD be faster for improving certain deficiencies. For example, in that portrait study you posted, there's some tilts and curves that aren't right (mainly in the neck and eyes), which would be more immediately obvious if you had done the study with lines, and you could make multiple attempts in the same amount of time that a painted study would require.
Hello. I think I should emphasize studying for two years, mind you. In the last two years I've create more than in all previous years combined. I do not say I've been drawing for the x+2 number of years, because relatively I've put in little effort in before 2018.

Also I did draw it before painting, what you're seeing is my inability for both skills.

Quote:Let us know what books and resources you're working with. I see a circle of view in that perspective image; have you been looking at handprint.com?
no, not handprint, but I do have books:
Atlas of Human Anatomy - Peck
Constructive Anatomy, Complete Guide to Drawing from Life - Bridgman
Color and Light, Imaginative Realism - Gurney
Dynamic Figure Drawing - Hogarth
Force Drawing Human Anatomy, Force Dynamic Life Drawing - Mattesi
Morpho Anatomy for Artists - Lauricella
Figure Drawing Design and Invention - Hampton
How to Draw - Robertson

Quote:I guess I'm just trying to say; don't get too caught up in needing to be 'fast' - it's better to do things correctly than quickly. You will learn more by going slower as opposed to trying to fly through things. Speed will come with time :)
Maybe it's beneficial it's not really a choice I want to make at this point. I'm unable to move quickly without settling for less so there's some bumper guards there.

I enjoy the process of creating so nothing I make is particularly rushed. Like you I wish for efficiency is all and always take the time needed.

Quote:it would be a good idea to make your work fit the forum size format
I don't know what this means specifically, sorry. I'm going to post links

Figure study: https://i.imgur.com/raboWQq.jpg
Eye study: https://i.imgur.com/P0YcJk0.jpg
hand study: https://i.imgur.com/dg5COHo.png
gross feet study: https://i.imgur.com/FXPhLRU.png

my drawing skill is very rough. l have trouble stabilizing my arm but I think that's normal at my stage
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#7
Having an unsteady arm is normal. Don't worry about it. It's a particularly big problem with digital drawing, because the tablet is such a slippery surface. Real paper and pencil provides much more traction.

You have a good practicing approach to my eyes. Even if you are going in the right direction, seeing any improvement will take a lot of time. Also, don't forget to take a break or draw whatever fun stuff you feel like drawing if you're on the verge of burning out.
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#8
The problem with a tablet is that due to the leak of traction of the stylus one tend to apply more pressure on the stylus.It can be a problem as your finger start to hurt.So i recommend using the side of your hand to create drag but the problem with that is that fatty pad of the hand tend to create uneven drag.There a tablet glove you can put to create a barrier between your hand and the surface of the tablet.The rest is just a question of lifting or applying pressure to the side of your hand to create drag or the reduce drag.The rest is just a question of using the tool as often as you can to create muscle memory(aka pressure sensitivity)

Hope this was helpful.


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My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
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#9
(05-15-2020, 11:07 AM)Pubic Enemy Wrote: You have a good practicing approach to my eyes. Even if you are going in the right direction, seeing any improvement will take a lot of time. Also, don't forget to take a break or draw whatever fun stuff you feel like drawing if you're on the verge of burning out.

I've only seen improvement so far. I don't really have a concept of making art for fun developed yet. The process is not enjoyable or relaxing, but the satisfaction of completing something I set my mind to is rewarding enough that I've been able to continue for years without having fun.

(05-15-2020, 11:42 AM)darktiste Wrote: The problem with a tablet is that due to the leak of traction of the stylus one tend to apply more pressure on the stylus.It can be a problem as your finger start to hurt.So i recommend using the side of your hand to create drag but the problem with that is that fatty pad of the hand tend to create uneven drag.There a tablet glove you can put to create a barrier between your hand and the surface of the tablet.The rest is just a question of lifting or applying pressure to the side of your hand to create drag or the reduce drag.The rest is just a question of using the tool as often as you can to create muscle memory(aka pressure sensitivity)

Hope this was helpful.

Yea, lets try out the glove. I won't have to clean my cintiq as much, either. Thanks!

I started another master study but that won't be complete until probably next weekend.
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