Darktiste Sketchbook
#1
description soon


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#2
Good start to your sketchbook, I really don't think it's necessary to put 'made by' over your sketches though, but thats upto you.

One recommendation I can give you is to study anatomy and how to build the human form creating poses from your mind, there are lots of videos on youtube and a whole section of resources with andrew loomis books and bridgman being highly recommended. Other than that just keep posting up your progress for feedback from the community, Glad to have you here :).

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#3
Hi there, so yes your heart is in the right place and its pretty clear the types of things you like, now you have to study anatomy and internalize forms so that you can draw from the top of your head. When creating things that you do not innately know how to draw you MUST use, collect and love references. Keep drawing and yes, you probably dont need to put your name across your images.
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#4
10min 1 min pose using bamboo tablet and photoshop cs6 i just start trying the tablet to day using posemaniac

auto critique i should try to do less stroke and add more form to the frame and also indicate where the subject eye are pointing


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#5
porportion study 1


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#6
(08-05-2013, 05:44 AM)darktiste Wrote: 10min 1 min pose using bamboo tablet and photoshop cs6 i just start trying the tablet to day using posemaniac

auto critique i should try to do less stroke and add more form to the frame and also indicate where the subject eye are pointing

is your tablet calibrated to "force proportions?" a good way to test this is that when you make a circle, does it come out as a circle? if its oval then your tablet might not be set up right.
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#7
Hey man!

Good start to your sketchbook! I can see that you're putting in the effort to get better and that's all that matters. Now to keep it consistent!!

Alrighty, so, a couple of things I noticed:

Your opening sketches seem to be better in terms of this:
[Image: LgOfgCv.jpg]

Basically, you're going to want to try your hardest to avoid "chicken scratching", and instead try to draw with more fluid, confident lines. I know how hard this can be, believe me :/ try to keep your position as natural as possible as you grip the pencil/tablet pen and move with your shoulder, arm, wrist:
I did a quick paintover to demonstrate what I mean:


But what's more important in this proportion study is that you're visualising the underlying structure of the form, so the skeleton, muscles etc. Though, this will come over time as you study, don't fret too much :)

I can't tell you, nor can anyone else tell you how you should be gripping your tools in the most comfortable way... it's up to you to experiment and find out :D
but in finding this position and continuously drawing for example gestures from*pixelovely*posespace*quickposes
*(and although not the best in terms of life models lol - the muscle anatomy is pretty useful. I wouldn't recommend doing gestures studies from here though...)posemaniacs
(... though I'm sure you know of a good few of these, in which case sorry ^^; haha)
you will without a doubt improve your technical skills - given you aren't just copying the outline of the models in each photo, but are considering the basic forms (like you stated in your previous post) that make up the human figure three-dimensionally.

For example, the sphere and cylinder!
If you're able to think about these forms as both solid and moldable/squishy in each appropriate context of a pose:


(e.g. whether the figure is tilting/sitting, and the variety of ways the muscles sit in each of these given contexts -- followed by how the skin wraps around these areas etc.), and are able to apply this to your drawings, you'll be able to see not only the human form in a new light, but many other facets of nature differently as well!

Aside from all this, I can't stress enough how important observation from life itself is.
Seeing the models in real life is a completely different experience to studying from photos, as I'm sure you're aware of.
But if you're unable to manage this, try to draw people around you! Portraits, clothed figures or anything lying about!

You need to be constantly thinking and trying to understand how these concepts you're going to be studying applies to the real world.

Keep up the great attitude and work, I hope this helps in at least some way!
And most importantly, have fun with it D5f02ecd

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#8
(08-05-2013, 12:07 PM)smrrfette Wrote: Hey man!

Good start to your sketchbook! I can see that you're putting in the effort to get better and that's all that matters. Now to keep it consistent!!

Alrighty, so, a couple of things I noticed:

Your opening sketches seem to be better in terms of this:
[Image: LgOfgCv.jpg]

Basically, you're going to want to try your hardest to avoid "chicken scratching", and instead try to draw with more fluid, confident lines. I know how hard this can be, believe me :/ try to keep your position as natural as possible as you grip the pencil/tablet pen and move with your shoulder, arm, wrist:
I did a quick paintover to demonstrate what I mean:

But what's more important in this proportion study is that you're visualising the underlying structure of the form, so the skeleton, muscles etc. Though, this will come over time as you study, don't fret too much :)

I can't tell you, nor can anyone else tell you how you should be gripping your tools in the most comfortable way... it's up to you to experiment and find out :D
but in finding this position and continuously drawing for example gestures from*pixelovely*posespace*quickposes
*(and although not the best in terms of life models lol - the muscle anatomy is pretty useful. I wouldn't recommend doing gestures studies from here though...)posemaniacs
(... though I'm sure you know of a good few of these, in which case sorry ^^; haha)
you will without a doubt improve your technical skills - given you aren't just copying the outline of the models in each photo, but are considering the basic forms (like you stated in your previous post) that make up the human figure three-dimensionally.

For example, the sphere and cylinder!
If you're able to think about these forms as both solid and moldable/squishy in each appropriate context of a pose:

(e.g. whether the figure is tilting/sitting, and the variety of ways the muscles sit in each of these given contexts -- followed by how the skin wraps around these areas etc.), and are able to apply this to your drawings, you'll be able to see not only the human form in a new light, but many other facets of nature differently as well!

Aside from all this, I can't stress enough how important observation from life itself is.
Seeing the models in real life is a completely different experience to studying from photos, as I'm sure you're aware of.
But if you're unable to manage this, try to draw people around you! Portraits, clothed figures or anything lying about!

You need to be constantly thinking and trying to understand how these concepts you're going to be studying applies to the real world.

Keep up the great attitude and work, I hope this helps in at least some way!
And most importantly, have fun with it D5f02ecd

i am doing 1min per pose that to early at my stage or not? because it may stress me to do chicken line and like i said i am pretty new to the tablet should i start by tracing over something?Oh and thx to remember me to have fun with it that the best advice
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#9
I think you should try traditional before tablet. For me, the tablet was like a new medium that I had to learn how to use, and you should be focusing on making confident lines with a pencil before you try doing that with a tablet. It's just harder to do, I think, so start easier.

You've got some good stuff, though! Keep up the anatomy studies.

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#10
darktiste Wrote:i am doing 1min per pose that to early at my stage or not? because it may stress me to do chicken line and like i said i am pretty new to the tablet should i start by tracing over something?Oh and thx to remember me to have fun with it that the best advice

It's up to you, you can start with 2mins if you wish. Remember: draw smart, not fast.
Never trace!
I agree with Zombie 100%!!

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#11
(08-05-2013, 01:14 PM)darktiste Wrote: i am doing 1min per pose that to early at my stage or not?

speedpainting will not teach you fundamentals when you are for sure at stage of learning fundamentals. Take more time for drawing and draw with perfection, not the fastest you can. think carefully about every line. Anatomy, perspective, foreshortening require a lot of concentration especially when they're not yet in your subconscious.

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#12
5min hand drawing session 1


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#13
my hand drawing is so rusty i was trying to avoid chicken line for this one and end up doing it for the contour line one also i don't have the best work space it a flat desk

i will start posting useful tutorial i find on youtube to speed up my learning curve and maybe it will help you to
so here the first and most important How to be self-critque and How to spot Drawing Mistakes
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=piXRPvx8bIE


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#14
these are also things that you have on your own body. Use a small mirror to draw hands and you will dramatically increase your hand knowledge. None of this is a fast process. If you are just starting out its going to be a while. No reason to rush things.
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#15
(08-05-2013, 01:26 PM)ZombieChinchilla Wrote: I think you should try traditional before tablet. For me, the tablet was like a new medium that I had to learn how to use, and you should be focusing on making confident lines with a pencil before you try doing that with a tablet. It's just harder to do, I think, so start easier.

You've got some good stuff, though! Keep up the anatomy studies.


Totally agree with that. You have much more control with a pencil. I think there's no point of using a tablet if you're only practicing linework.

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#16
i only think that using a tablet once in a will can help me get us to it.
But maybe it better to focus on that later.
I will tell you my secret i fear a lot the traditional way i don't feel comfortable at the moment.
I prefer the tablet or the mouse for the moment because i can use shape and shortcut.
It also boring to scan hand made drawing.Also the image lost is quality even with the best adjustment
You need to clean up when you erase then the pencil need to be sharpen a lot of little thing that are annoying.The computer is 10 better or more mainly because you can zoom coloring is easy you have a history to track back the action you made you can work on layer etc...
My Preference is clear i really need someone to explain me what the real deal trying to perfect something that is outdated
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#17
i understand that fear but, when you are just starting, its much, much better to use traditional tools.
Why? well, as you said, painting and drawing with a real pencil and real oils/acrilics/etc... is more difficult.
You dont have all the fancy things photoshop has, you cant use ctrl+z, you cant make zoom and so on. But because of that, you will actually learn 100x times faster.
I always used traditional tools like pencils and oils, i only went for digital painting when i realized that i really didnt have money to keep buying supplies haha.
You could say that digital is faster and much cheaper than traditional, but thats useless unless you have good fundamentals.

I suggest you to take a book/video about drawing from life, get a big drawing paper and some pencils and start making life drawings every day.
I spent a whole year drawing fucking fruits and greek statues in art school, but it was worthy.

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#18
i think i need space that all i really need i am thinking about buying a art desk because at the moment i only got a computer desk(who is use by all the family) and a eating table(who i overload with stuff laptop and document)
Maybe i should go take some art leason somewhere with space and people to support me
So you if you read this what do the think a drawing table or art leason or something else?
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#19
this is all you need to start:

[Image: caballete%2B2.jpg]

But if you can start taking life drawing classes, that would be awesome, go for it!

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#20
(08-07-2013, 08:25 AM)EduardoGaray Wrote: this is all you need to start:

[Image: caballete%2B2.jpg]

But if you can start taking life drawing classes, that would be awesome, go for it!

how will i post my result with such a big canva i am use to drawing on printing paper
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