Mochiman's sketchbook
#21
Some more from today






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#22
Hey! Just thought to come by and say something in return. You do have a nice variety, and I recognize a lot of my own beginning over what you are doing lol, so you will improve! Just give yourself time. I would say maybe because I was today thinking about this, one piece of advice I wish I had followed sooner is, to time yourself (like put at clock or a stopwatch) and is not about being fast but rather keep track of where you spent more or less time, so you can decide what are you gonna work more at next.
If you feel overwhelmed doing something, that is good! Means you will get more mileage from that, you can try simplifying or reducing what you are studying, say if that tank was a struggle, do a study of just one side, or the treads, or specific details? Just forget about all the rest, try to make problems smaller, one at a time.
Also I would like to see more about your personal pieces, one mistake I think I made back when I began studying was to forgone doing personal pieces for a while (I would get the jitters), to me that was a mistake, I got burnt out. If you feel like that sometime, remember try to grab onto why is it that you draw, and don't forget it.
Keep it up!
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#23
The timer is an interesting idea.

Yeah I do neglect personal work. I guess a lot of times when I have an idea its something I don't have the skill set for yet so I end up not doing it which is bad practice. The thing that really burnt me out in the past though was just doing too many book studies of stuff like perspective techniques. Good to know but I wasn't ever really applying it to sketching or personal work and wasn't really doing much sketching.

I recently watched an Aaron Blaise stream where he did a mashup of three animals. Was thinking of maybe trying something like that with stuff I've been practicing.
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#24
Did do that


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#25
Now that's what I call applying knowledge, haha. Those are great.

Personal work is very important. Studying is great, but at some point you can only get better at drawing the things you want to draw by actually drawing them.
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#26
Yeah! Good stuff! That's kind of why you do studies, to learn something about them. Studying for the sake of studying is like pouring water on a bucket with a hole at the bottom, you just end up losing what you put in eventually.
Okay, the frog-bat-ram I'm gonna steal lol. That's so rad. Ha ha.
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#27
A couple more pages




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#28
A few more






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#29
I advise more time spent on drawing ellipse inside square.It strange how you can draw complex object but somehow a box seem to be what you struggle to draw.It like sometime the simplest form are the hardest to make flawless.If you struggle to draw ellipse try using a pencil before to get the shape you want so you can erase it later.But i guess you doing like peter han suggested and use a pen to see what are the area you still need to work on.

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
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#30
Yeah my ellipses suck. Definitely something I should practice more in isolation. Instead of the pencil I use the marker but yeah I try mostly drawing with a pen like Peter Han suggests as you said.
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#31
More airplane stuff mostly


















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#32
Just for fun




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#33
Hey! Great work with those boxes and structural drawing! Kudos for hustling with those planes xD I know is hard as hell.

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#34
Yeah. I find them really hard. Lots of curved lines in perspective and ellipses. The wings especially though are giving me trouble.
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#35
Just a pretty basic study sheet from proko for today.


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#36
I have a hard time deciding how much detail I should include I think. Perspective issues aside I feel like I end up making a mess out of stuff like treads that have a lot of detail in small space.






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#37
Well first is where is the point of attention you want in your image and no you should not make the image have the same amount of detail all around it kill realism as object who tend be in the distant are generally blurry due to the atmospheric perspective something i encourage you to learn more about it.Of course if the scene is inside scene there alot less of this and it where thing can start to really compete for attention.A good exercise to practice reducing texture noise is to do those texture scale suggested in dynamic drawing by peter han.You don't know what i am talking about when i say texture scale look at the link?The more an object is foreshorten the more dramatic is the change in texture scale.A good way to start practicing this concept is to try to draw a wall stone wall or a brick wall as it vanish into the distance and to adjust the level of texture as it decrease toward the vanish point and increase as it approach the foreground.

https://www.google.com/search?q=texture+...era&hs=lIP

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
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#38
Yeah you're right. I should do that exercise sometime soon.
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#39
Looking good dude. Especially with these structural drawings.
Couldn't help but notice that Renault tank on p1 lol. I'm literally writing a school paper on it currently and they're cool as shit! hahah

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#40
Yeah. I don't know a lot about them but I like those old tanks from before WW2.




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