Making a graphic novel / manga
#41
I think you should use your half tone either exclusively on your character or exclusively on your background in this way you will create contrast.I also recommend you take a look at pop art due to the fact they use halftone.Also a good way to avoid wasting time is to know when to ommit detail such as background.But it key to understand when your background is important to situate the action.For example if a couple travel for hour and have a discution in a car during a few for example it not necessarly useful for the viewr to have background until they arrive at a destination.


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#42
(09-10-2020, 08:27 AM)darktiste Wrote: I think you should use your half tone either exclusively on your character or exclusively on your background in this way you will create contrast.


Yes, not always, but in this case this is true.

_______

I looked at mangas and realized something:

before I was assuming, that they use different halftone-patterns for different colors. So if you want light dark take one spacing between the dots and if you want it a little bit more dark, take away a bit space between the dots.

But I noticed, that they are using exactly the same dot-pattern always, no matter what the color is, and combine it with additionally grey-tones underneith.

So I tried that, here is the next version, tiny bit better.



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#43
Hey, looks like you are figuring out the halftone thing, so that's cool. I think you can do it either way, with a tone underneath or just the dots. You can decide what looks good I guess. I think pure dot halftones look a lot better when you have a black fill, (shadow areas that are pure black). Right now you aren't really including any shadows, so it looks a little odd.

Also, this might interest you. There is a way to convert a toned image to halftone after all. https://medibangpaint.com/en/use/2016/09...paint-pro/

I tried it out with just some random image. Results are way better than Krita, and instantaneous. Looks pretty cool. Idk if you want to use that in combination with the other halftone tools.


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#44
Somewhat like this?

I put the black, where I would assume the darkest shadows.



Page 17 V.1



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#45
Yeah pretty much. That looks better. You might want your lines and your darkest tone to be the same value though. Usually you wouldn't have black filled areas and grey lines.

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#46
Just a few thumbnails for the city; will be used on the next pages.



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#47
Hey man! Great to see another comic artist on here : )

Who are the comic artists you admire and aspire to be like? Doing focused studies of different aspects of their work is a great way to learn the craft! By that I mean, for example if you want to study 'panel layout', get a sequence of pages from their comic all on the screen and make notes about how they vary the size, shapes, number of panels on the page etc. Do they use more panels, cropped in tight for dialogue scenes? Less, but bigger sized panels for action scenes etc. Try and verbalise what mood they were going for and how they achieved it.

You can do the same with spotting blacks, screentone, types of shot they use, character poses, anything! Just focus on one aspect at a time.

As a specific critique of your comic, is this intended for digital or print? If it's print, what kind of page size are you thinking of? I ask because the text is very large for a print comic unless it's a really small page, while it's a good size for something like a social media post. I like to make my text as small as I can while people can still read it, leave a good amount of white space around the text in the bubble and then have room to include more of the artwork.

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