help with perspective
#1
hi,does anyone have any suggestion on ow to effectively practice perspective?i have already practiced freehand boxes and boxes in perspective with a ruler but i still struggle with setting up a complex scene,has anyone any suggestion on how to improve this?
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#2
It sounds like you need a good book that gives lots of guidelines for how to set up a scene. I think you'd benefit from reading Successful Drawing by Loomis if you haven't (can be found here or here if you don't want to download). It's a very practical book. It doesn't go into three-point perspective, but that is not urgent for you to learn.
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#3
Loomis is a great resource and it's also free! So yes I second this advice.

Also I personally am a fan of Scott Robertson's How to draw book. But many people find it way too technical. So I'll leave it up to you :)

Fundamentals of perspective on Gnomon is amazing too. To me, it was even more digestable than Loomis, but we all learn differently. He also covers 3 point perpective.

If you can find Krenz patreon on rotation in perspective, it's a great supplement to what I mentioned above, but not enough on its own. If not, you can pm me maybe I could help.

3d software is not just a tool for cheating but it can also be used to deepen your understanding of the perspective think in 3d space. But again just a supplement to one of the resources above. Blender and basic version of Sketchup are free.

Good luck!

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#4
Mileage and good understanding of perspective.A ruler is like practice wheel on a bike you want to get them off as soon possible once you feel comfortable that your shape follow the perspective consistently in your work from one piece to the other.The absolute rule is that you must remember at anytime where is the horizon line everything else will become a matter of becoming good at estimating the convergence of your vanishing line don't feel discouraged and keep going at it.The problem with a scene is often that you will be confronted with object that are below and above the horizon line and you need you know how to adjust accordindly.This why the horizon line is key point.Also there spacial measuring technique that apply to perspective that one should learn if they want to understand where to place object according to a plan for example.

Loomis is the most affordable as avaible book for begginerto more advance concepté

The book i suggest : Andrew Loomis - Successful Drawing
This book is the one with the most content on perspective

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The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
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#5
There's no harm in using appropriate tools for the task. Rule away.

I second looking at Scott Robinson. His technical drawing is referenced at every tertiary institution I've attended and the man just has a plethora of resources available on form and perspective.

For complex scenes, if you are considering cityscapes I highly recommend taking any city view from Google earth and experimenting with the unique horizons and individual eye-lines, turn them into something different like medieval or scifi scapes. I see a lot of people do this in perspective studies and it's also just fun to do.

"Your art has same face syndrome"

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#6
thank you for the great answers,i have already studied successful drawing and i find myself struggling with perspective grids,it's the part that i don't understand,expecially the reasoning behind the measuring point,loomis seems to just place them randomly when it comes to creating perspective grids
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#7
(07-26-2021, 06:56 PM)LonelyTroll Wrote: thank you for the great answers,i have already studied successful drawing and i find myself struggling with perspective grids,it's the part that i don't understand,expecially the reasoning behind the measuring point,loomis seems to just place them randomly when it comes to creating perspective grids

You can find more about that in scott robertson book 
Drawing and Sketching from imagination with scott robertson and if you can't find that you can probably find people who would explain it on youtube you just need to type something like perspective grid technique and theory something similar.

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
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#8
Loomis places the measuring points semi-randomly because placing them precisely isn't that important for visual art. You'll probably need a book on architectural perspective to get into the placement of measuring points, like "Architectural Sketching and Drawing in Perspective" on this page: http://www.survivorlibrary.com/index.php...%20drawing

Handprint's tutorial also goes into measuring points: https://www.handprint.com/HP/WCL/tech10.html

Let's just say it involves a compass (or making very large circles in a digital art program) and is very boring. As far as I know, you only truly need measuring points if you're translating a flat architectural plan to 3D. I've never heard of a professional artist using it. Even Scott Robertson's book only gives the typical rectangle multiplication method for creating grids (the one where you run a line through the corners of a square to the horizon line and use it as a diagonal vanishing point for making more squares).
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