What exercise you can do to get better at drawing texture?
#1
I was just wondering how do you go about learning new texture.

So far i only seen 5 way to learn texture 

-Texture scale (Most famously seen in dynamic drawing class teach by peter han and sometime art book)
-Trial and error (Applying texture to a drawing hoping for the best and than trying to figure out how to do better next time)
-Texture study(Finding a single texture an applying it to a sphere or cube)
-Use photobashing to create a sense texture
-Using sh1t ton of brush to create a sense of texture hoping for the best.

is there any other way to learn texture???

I am currently trying the Texture scale technique but it hurt my brain because the possiblity of texture are endless.Since you start with a infinity of texture that you need to choose from it seem i can't make a choose.For me it seem way easier to just look at a drawing and figure out what inside the scene in term of texture.But there a problem to this because you do not only focus one texture at a time.For me this defeat the idea of being able to see error with ease because it require to create multiple texture.

I think what is the best thing to do atleast for me is to do texture scale and than applying those onto Texture study.Note that i am currently working tradionally.How can someone study an infinity of texture and ''know'' where to begin?How would you go about starting learning texture?

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#2
As you're working traditionally, I've followed a lot of artists that suggest to think of texture with form, not as a last treatment which is how a lot of digital artists operate.

I gave away a really good book on this but I guess resources depend on what you want to learn. Seeing texture in forms as you build your structure, thinking of it in terms of different surfaces and how they're perceived through light, bringing it into focus, or are you after the technical aspects of rendering specific textures?

You can always cheat with photo editing software but it's worth experimenting with other mediums. I only like to use PS for colour and atmosphere. Textures added in later look obvious and enter that uncanny zone because it's not built around form, it's just a coating almost. Texture brushes are wildly overemphasised in digital art. A great way to make a quick splash concept but not always accurate or appealing.  

Before trying to answer if there are any other ways, what exactly are you doing now to train yourself in textures?



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#3
(01-12-2018, 07:57 PM)RottenPocket Wrote: As you're working traditionally, I've followed a lot of artists that suggest to think of texture with form, not as a last treatment which is how a lot of digital artists operate.

I gave away a really good book on this but I guess resources depend on what you want to learn. Seeing texture in forms as you build your structure, thinking of it in terms of different surfaces and how they're perceived through light, bringing it into focus, or are you after the technical aspects of rendering specific textures?

You can always cheat with photo editing software but it's worth experimenting with other mediums. I only like to use PS for colour and atmosphere. Textures added in later look obvious and enter that uncanny zone because it's not built around form, it's just a coating almost. Texture brushes are wildly overemphasised in digital art. A great way to make a quick splash concept but not always accurate or appealing.  

Before trying to answer if there are any other ways, what exactly are you doing now to train yourself in textures?

I am doing scale like those one to be able to apply onto any surface with no particular project just to train myself to be able to create appealing not over rendered texture not over simplified texture trying to find a good balance.Going from chaotic to orderly and from dark to light also going from small to big.Also like you said to be able to create texture that wrap around a form in a realistic way if possible.


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#4
Not overly rendered or simplified, but appealing. Basically you're looking at stylisation. There's really not much to add than what you're already doing, because style comes intuitively, a result of the choices you make when creating. You may not have to reach rendering perfection to reach this goal but it's definitely worth following people that specialise in it. I recommend viewing videos by Dan Beardshaw on youtube. The guy is a lot more casual and relatable than the self proclaimed mentors out there. He communicates very well his perception of the process which I find more helpful than a strict how-to.



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