After a lesson in humility, how to efficiently practice?
#1
Hello CD's forum users! Long time no see!

Recently, after a 3~4 years art hiatus, I went back to drawing. But this time, using what I learned from others hobbies (as a amateur violinist) I decided to practice with an objective in mind: I did enjoyed comics, so why not focus on them?

After going through a pretty simple anatomy course in Udemy (simple, but helpful) I decided to give a go and try to design a character. "Surely it will go better than 70% of the amateur guys drawing an anime derivative character at DA..." I arrogantly thought. Mean smile

Well... It didn't.  

Actually, not only it came pretty bad (but better than any attempt before) but I committed all the erros that sworn myself I wouldn't. Yeah... I was worse than most of those guys.   Sad

Also, I realized that I did get a bunch of bad habits in my formative years: when I was younger (15~16) I did study in a pretty bad atelier, where believe it or not, using rulers or trying to study others artists was frowned upon by the teachers.

(Imagine my surprise when I saw (only recently, believe me) some famous comic artists using rulers! Or advising to emulate your favorite artists! Everybody always told me that doing this would destroy any chance of developing your style!)  Shock

I simple don't know what to study from here. Yes I understand that practice is the cure for this ailment (bad art), but what to practice? Where to go? There is a world of tips out there, but no framework to use them. Should I go and emulate my favorite artists? No? Should I go and study all Loomis books before doing something I like? 

Worst of all, I saw beginner amateur artists that in 6 months did a quantum leap in their abilities while I also saw "professional artists" (self-proclaimed) that are simple stagnated in an average art ability after YEARS, even if they are trying to live of it.

I am not trying to say that there is a magic silver pill that you take and make you be better in art. But I do believe there is a 20% - 80% rule in practice. If so, what is the 20%? What is the piece that is missing from this puzzle?
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#2
There no secret to getting better in art it how good you retain information and how often you practice that make the progress happen.If you keep stopping and coming back it won't stick for very long before you forget.

Stop thinking there a magic wand.We all want an easy way the true is if it was easy everyone would be a professional artist.

You can watch a ton of drawing video but it won't make you a great artist if you don't put the pencil down to forge those knowledge into something.

There no where to start because everyone is at different point in there art knowledge but the starting point is i would say understanding line first of all being able to control them.

I can't tell you from A to Z what to learn because i don't know what you want to do as an artist.
But it good to follow someone you want to emulate so that you can see what kind of path he as gone through and see if you wanna go in that road.

Style is often what we obsess over but it rarely obtain without understand other rule we should follow before we are able to ''break the rule''

First of all if there is no art to show how are we suppose to help you.First thing would be to show us a few thing you did so we have an idea of what we might have to suggest to you.You can open a sketchbook thread and upload some of your work there.

Be prepare for pain and kill the idea that your art is perfect.We are student here the student mindset is to never forget someone else know better most of the time.

Good luck here your dagger welcome to the guild.


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#3
Quote:If so, what is the 20%? What is the piece that is missing from this puzzle?


Can't give advice to work we can't even see.

It's debatable whether or not what you're trying to achieve is indeed impossible. One thing's for sure: it's impossible to defeat a person who doesn't know how to quit.
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#4
Welcome back Bonesworth :).

What's the 20% that gives the 80%?

Here's my formula - it seems to work for me but might not fit anyone else:

1. Think in 3D. Draw through the forms.
2. Work from Big to Small. Simple to detailed.
3. Study from life. Build a visual library.
4. Practice all of the above over and over again.

Hope that helps. Good luck dude :).

“Today, give a stranger one of your smiles. It might be the only sunshine he sees all day.” -- H. Jackson Brown Jr.

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#5
Thanks for the replies. You guys convinced me to create a sketchbook here.

(11-26-2018, 09:29 AM)Artloader Wrote: Welcome back Bonesworth :).

What's the 20% that gives the 80%?

Here's my formula - it seems to work for me but might not fit anyone else:

1. Think in 3D. Draw through the forms.
2. Work from Big to Small. Simple to detailed.
3. Study from life. Build a visual library.
4. Practice all of the above over and over again.

Hope that helps. Good luck dude :).

Thanks, Artloader. Actually you gave me an idea.
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