Atceterra's sketchbook
#1
Hewwo so here's a bit of the recent art i made of my first D&D character, Zeza. This was the first character sheet that i made ever in my life and I added another sketch of her. If ever you got some critiques for what I make I'm happy to hear it! Objectively, I think I could work more on the forms of the anatomy and I don't think the design really communicated the idea that she is a femme fatale knight who fell from grace.

I'm planning next to show some of the earliest work I posted online and try to redraw it.


Attached Files Image(s)




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#2
Welcome to Crimson Daggers! Cool character! DnD character's are so great to practice character design, they all have a narrative behind them!

If you want to go for a femme fatale, I'd look up famous femme fatales from comics and games and make some notes about what exactly their designs had that make them come across that way. Then take any bits that fit with your character and try to design them in. Like Bayonetta for example, it's all about the height, tall character, even taller with her shoes and this wrap of hair on top to make her taller still. Kitana from mortal kombat has a mask and lots of spiky shapes all over her.

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#3
The first thing that strikes me is that you should research more gestures and how to place a character within 3D space. My favorite design on the first drawing is the third one on the right.

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#4
Hi Atceterra, welcome to Crimson Daggers :).

Nice start here, I like your femme fatale knight who fell from grace - cool backstory :).

Just some quick feedback on your drawings if I may, I noticed that your proportions are a bit off and I wasn't sure if this was a deliberate design choice or not but normally on a human figure, the crotch area should be around half way up, I did a quick draw over to illustrate but you're better off studying someone like Andrew Loomis' proportions of the human figure.




Here's what Andrew Loomis had to say:

[Image: MLeglQU8S8rigZt824iQfXE9tNUBOXALp0LHecf0...J1mg--gwqQ]

Hope that helps :).

Good luck and keep going :).

“Today, give a stranger one of your smiles. It might be the only sunshine he sees all day.” -- H. Jackson Brown Jr.

CD Sketchbook



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#5
The question is what is the race and the proportion of that race.From what i am seeing using a teenage or children as your model would be a good idea.

As a side note it would be useful for people to know how far you understand your fundamental as it what will help them give you valuable feedback.I am myself trying to do less personal piece and trying to work in a way where i am doing each study to fix a particular issue i know it very hard not to just draw what we like but if you can learn anything from me is that when you leak study your work suffer and stagnate.I hope this will encourage you but nothing force you do study if you see this as a hobby but when you want to progress remember this advise.


Attached Files Image(s)



My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
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#6
Great start here! I agree with the critiques that you should keep an eye on more ideal proportions, great recommendations from Artloader as well in regards to studying Andrew Loomis' work, which I also highly recommend. Keep practicing, looking forward to seeing how you progress further!

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#7
Thanks for the comments guys! It's great to see that there's some critiques on my anatomy cause I never do seem to get it right. I see that I do fall short on my proportions so I'll get onto that when I could finish wrapping my head around perspective first. I don't have a loomis book though so I can't really reference it but I do have a michael hampton book. Not sure though it has proportions from what I've skimmed throught. Maybe I'll do some practices on proprtion then.

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#8
(11-26-2020, 10:51 AM)darktiste Wrote: The question is what is the race and the proportion of that race.From what i am seeing using a teenage or children as your model would be a good idea.

As a side note it would be useful for people to know how far you understand your fundamental as it what will help them give you valuable feedback.I am myself trying to do less personal piece and trying to work in a way where i am doing each study to fix a particular issue i know it very hard not to just draw what we like but if you can learn anything from me is that when you leak study your work suffer and stagnate.I hope this will encourage you but nothing force you do study if you see this as a hobby but when you want to progress remember this advise.
To answer your question, she's supposed to be a 20-ish fierna tiefling and I started learning art seriously around 2 years ago. I just haven't practiced as much as I like to because of school but I am trying out to get into an art course.

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#9
(11-27-2020, 01:21 PM)Atceterra Wrote: Thanks for the comments guys! It's great to see that there's some critiques on my anatomy cause I never do seem to get it right. I see that I do fall short on my proportions so I'll get onto that when I could finish wrapping my head around perspective first. I don't have a loomis book though so I can't really reference it but I do have a michael hampton book. Not sure though it has proportions from what I've skimmed throught. Maybe I'll do some practices on proprtion then.
You can visit the resource section in the sketchbook section i am sure you will find what you need.

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
Reply
#10
(11-22-2020, 01:52 PM)JyonnyNovice Wrote: Welcome to Crimson Daggers! Cool character! DnD character's are so great to practice character design, they all have a narrative behind them!

If you want to go for a femme fatale, I'd look up famous femme fatales from comics and games and make some notes about what exactly their designs had that make them come across that way. Then take any bits that fit with your character and try to design them in. Like Bayonetta for example, it's all about the height, tall character, even taller with her shoes and this wrap of hair on top to make her taller still. Kitana from mortal kombat has a mask and lots of spiky shapes all over her.
Thanks for the tips! I'll definetely keep that in mind when I try character design again.

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