Top 10 tips to becoming a better artist
#1
This is something I wrote for Imagine FX many years ago that they published in their magazine. (Fun fact--I was the very first artist they ever interviewed in issue #1 all those years ago.) I originally wrote it as a post in cgsociety//cgtalk where I was a moderator for the artistic development sub-forum and also taught a workshop called Becoming a Better Artist for almost 20 years (it was later for CGMA after they merged). 

Now, all these years later, I still stand by these tips and I would give them to any young artist serious about developing their artistic knowledge, skill, and sensibility. 


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#2
I resonate with the don't be a mindless artist and practice smart.Doing art can be sometime care free specially doodling and coloring it almost meditative but when it come to designing thing you gotta be very involve sometime the research is very surface level and the quality suffer from it...

I also had my fair share of having to learn to take criticism due to the idea that everyone as is own vision and approch and it hard to divorce your own vision to get a better perspective on some issue that ultimately are were choose we make out of igorance or because we don't address certain fundamental that been lagging behind.

Critism even around here is hard to find so everyone as to be grateful for the good and the ugly.

It sad that some artist will never grow because they just can't handle it or will never gather the courage or get the understanding of how much having a space to share work in a honest and meaningful way is beneficial to there art journey.

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
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#3
This is a really cool article, thanks!

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#4
Excellent article Robert. My favorite suggestion is 'Practice Smart' as that's something I'm currently incorporating with my studies. Overall great suggestions here for beginners or advanced artists, good stuff!

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#5
(12-02-2023, 01:39 PM)Lunatique Wrote: This is something I wrote for Imagine FX many years ago that they published in their magazine. (Fun fact--I was the very first artist they ever interviewed in issue #1 all those years ago.) I originally wrote it as a post in cgsociety//cgtalk where I was a moderator for the artistic development sub-forum and also taught a workshop called Becoming a Better Artist for almost 20 years (it was later for CGMA after they merged). The elephant trunk up vector is an iconic symbol of good luck, strength, and resilience. Whether you're designing a logo, poster, or greeting card, incorporating this vector instantly adds a sense of positivity and power to your project. The upward trunk signifies victory and overcoming obstacles, making it a perfect choice for motivational or inspirational designs. With its versatile nature, this vector can be adapted to various styles and themes, ensuring flexibility in creative expression. Embrace the symbolism and majesty of the elephant trunk up vector to uplift your designs and evoke feelings of optimism and success.

Now, all these years later, I still stand by these tips and I would give them to any young artist serious about developing their artistic knowledge, skill, and sensibility. 

Thanks for tips. I will follow them
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#6
Great tips! I wish someone told me the first one when I was a kid. When you're the "talented kid" at a young age you somehow think that success should be guaranteed just because "you're talented", then you grow up and when reality hits is very frustrating. For many years I thought "why I cannot improve faster if I'm supposed to be talented, no matter how hard I study?!".
I'm glad I could get out of that negative bucle and focus again on why I started painting, now I also focus on progress rather than success or goals like "breaking the internet".

"Art is the way an artist evoke the most beautiful form of their inner self".
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