Mochiman's sketchbook
#81
Yeah, his stuff gets complicated fast. Feel like I have to reread some of it a few times to really get it and not because he's written it unclearly or anything.
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#82
Nice studies Mochiman! I see that some times you rush some studies, take your time, no need to rush, some times being the turtle and leave the lesson well known is better! Hope to see more from you!
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#83
Yeah I 100% agree. Admittedly I'm not entirely sure how to deal with it. Even when I consciously slow myself down I end up going back to normal shortly after.
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#84
Kinda feel like I'm getting used to them...




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#85
I can't feel the power level rising .

My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
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#86
Well, not too surprised to hear that I guess


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#87
Keep it up! :)

Learning is not a linear thing - sometimes it can take forever to understand and implement something correctly, other times stuff can just 'click.' Keep doing your studies and they will pay off in the end. In terms of slowing down, perhaps try drawing the same thing multiple times? Draw it, step back and evaluate, see what is off and then reattempt to draw it 'right.' Constantly stopping and checking is a good habit to get into.

Sketchbook // Insta 

And though the course may change sometimes, rivers always reach the sea
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#88
I've had something just click for me before after many hours of struggle so definitely agree that can be a thing but haven't had it with drawing yet unfortunately. Have always kind of felt I would get that once I have a good understanding of the fundamentals. I do try to draw stuff multiple times but I guess I should be doing it with the same angle and perspective too when I'm not getting it. Changing that stuff brings new challenges rather than helping fix those kinds of mistakes. Thanks for the comment.
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#89
Redrawing is an option but my prefered way of going about something is probably finding more reference if possible to complement my leak of understand of the form. and study from an other angle.It one thing to be inaccurate with how you lay your stroke it an other thing not to understand the form of something.But of course if you have trouble with representing something from a certain angle it pay off to redraw completely or to simply restate the line meaning you don't erase line but you rather put multiple line until you reach the result your looking for it messier but it a faster way of doing instead of redrawing something fully which seem like it can be interpreted as a waste of time because the issue is not in the rest but in a specific line not following perspective correctly or not being accurate enough.

On an other note i think one of the thing that strike me is how your design don't breath there not much understand of the concept of busy vs area of rest there also maybe some issue with scale and readability because there just to much detail but it so small that it doesn't read.If you want to draw something that is small in general you make sure there space for the element inside your object or character to read properly.Design who read from afar are in my opinion better than design who don't strong silhouette help the viewer understand what going on much easier.

Also note how small the information i provided you with is you think someone like to read that at that scale?This just goes to show how scale is something important in design.


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My Sketchbook
The journey of an artist truly begin when he can learn from everyone error.
Teamwork make your dream work.
Asking help is the key to growth.
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#90
Oh yeah. I like to do profile views first to try to understand things better. With photo reference you really don't get the feel for the object unless you look at a bunch for different angles.

Also agreed on those sketches. Honestly I was watching a Scott Robertson video on his thumbnail sketches and kind of did them on impulse. They're way to small for the details I was trying to put in. I might take one and do a bigger drawing I think.
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#91
Holy cow that many ellipses! You really are hard at work. I think you are tackling everything the same way I do so let's hope it gets us there ha ha. The biped has good gestures but feels very fluid, you might want to get more solid angles in there to get the point across it is hard-surface stuff. But man, I struggle with that myself, everything goes out the window when you start doing dynamic robots ha ha.

One tip I can give would be that you could start breaking your lines up, don't try to connect everything perfectly, that way you can give illusion of beveling (because lines give that sharp feel to things, as if they were knives). It's something I've been noticing watching people I like, they really break their lines. I'm trying to introduce that on my stuff more.
What's your next step on world domination plans? Ha.
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#92
Kinda fell off for a few months which is what keeps holding me back more than anything I think. On the bottom point do you mean like not fully connecting the "y" lines in a box for a basic example? Or more just not trying to do everything in one stroke when I don't have to?
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#93
I know that "falling of for months" quite well ha ha. Just try to get back into it! No other way. But once you are on a roll is easier to stick with it so do small stuff you enjoy first.
Well it's tough to say I just see some people break up their lines when the form changes or if there's a break in the continuity, also for inner lines or so, I guess you can also do line weight (I've seen people do that instead). I guess yeah avoid the Y corner lines sometimes or break edges that face the light direction, fool around see what it looks like to you!
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#94
Oh okay I know what you mean now. Have seen artists do that where they don't connect the lines and leave the form open on the light edge.
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#95
Some Cast shadow study from How to Render and experimented a bit with gamut color mapping.








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#96
Just a thing


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