Peter's Sketchbook
Why use umber if you don't want your painting to dry quickly? It's like adding a dryer to your medium and then complaining that it dries too quickly. Use another pigment if it's an issue.

There are other contributing factors you should be aware of. What kind of ground did you put on the panel or did you get it pre-made? If you got it pre-made you should know what type of ground is on there because that completely changes how the painting will act. My guess is that the paint isn't drying, rather you've gotten yourself an acrylic or absorbent ground and it's just absorbing the oil rather than drying it. If it was actually dry, adding turpentine wouldn't do anything. If you want to fix this, use a non absorbent oil ground and it should extend the drying time by a lot.

Speaking of turpentine. Why does the paint look so oily? Did you add oil to it? Or are you using oily paint from tubes? Generally an underpainting is just done with a handful of colors and a bunch of turpentine, it leaves it nice and matte, somewhat absorbent and very easy to paint over. It can be a good idea to get in the habit of spreading your paint out on blotting paper before using it because manufacturers pre-load paint with medium rather than have it be properly stiff. Only company I know of that doesn't add medium to their paints is Old Holland.

They should teach you this stuff.

Discord - JetJaguar#8954
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(Yesterday, 02:17 AM)Fedodika Wrote: 3d is like using a model thats free in many ways, you just have to have the fundamental knowledge to use gesture and anatomy to make it not look like a 3d model and like it fits in an illustration

Maybe I'm wprrying too much asbout things and doing things correctly, I know professionals use 3d but I though that was more for getting a quick idea across and not a finished product. I think I'd be ok with the gesture but my anatomy knowledge would definitely let me down big time.

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(Yesterday, 02:43 AM)Tristan Berndt Wrote: Why use umber if you don't want your painting to dry quickly? It's like adding a dryer to your medium and then complaining that it dries too quickly. Use another pigment if it's an issue.

There are other contributing factors you should be aware of. What kind of ground did you put on the panel or did you get it pre-made? If you got it pre-made you should know what type of ground is on there because that completely changes how the painting will act. My guess is that the paint isn't drying, rather you've gotten yourself an acrylic or absorbent ground and it's just absorbing the oil rather than drying it. If it was actually dry, adding turpentine wouldn't do anything. If you want to fix this, use a non absorbent oil ground and it should extend the drying time by a lot.

Speaking of turpentine. Why does the paint look so oily? Did you add oil to it? Or are you using oily paint from tubes? Generally an underpainting is just done with a handful of colors and a bunch of turpentine, it leaves it nice and matte, somewhat absorbent and very easy to paint over. It can be a good idea to get in the habit of spreading your paint out on blotting paper before using it because manufacturers pre-load paint with medium rather than have it be properly stiff. Only company I know of that doesn't add medium to their paints is Old Holland.

They should teach you this stuff.

Apologies Tristan I forgot to mention what surface I was using and so on. I know umber dries quickly but this seemed to be drying in a 3 hour session which seems crazy to me. I know it dries quick but should it really be that quick?

This was done on a hardwood panel that I prepped myself with 3 coats of gesso (pip seymour to be precise).

Regarding the oily look I think that might be due to how I took the pic, in hand it looks matte (apart from some areas that are abit shiny but I think that's due to how the light is hitting the brush strokes, could be wrong though). I posiitoned a light above it to light the painting as best as I could. I normally use freezer paper over my palette. Not sure if it's the same as blotting paper though.

Not sure how the painting classes at Watts work in person but from the online videos that I've watched so far in their oil painting section they don't really go over tools and mediums etc in great depth. They tell you what brushes to get and medium, and suggestions for work surfaces but that's about it.

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Been working on my live streaming h/w tonight which is almost complete, gonna spend another 30 mins on it as I'm trying to stick to 2h30m this week to work on my speed.

Spent the last hour or 2 taking some more photos of myself to use as reference and then doing a little bash up of a few photos that I liked the look of. Going to use a mix of the pics I took along with some photos that a user  kind enough of to provide on another forum and refer back to my original sketch. Tried getting the eye level as close as possible to my sketch aswell as the pose but I'm no model haha. Definitely need to work on my photo skills as it will be invaluable in the the future.






Got life classes the next 3 days, might have an hour or 2 in between where I can work on the poster but Friday will be the next day I can dedicate alot of time to it.

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